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Milwaukee, WI Steamer GLOBE Explosion, Nov 1860

C. H. BURNS, the clerk of the boat, was blown into the air some distance, fell upon the hurricane deck and escaped with some slight injuries upon the had and hip. ROBERT STODDARD, first mate, was badly injured, but will recover.
CHARLES BEDDER had his head severely cut and is in a dangerous condition. A German, name unknown, is lying at the Marine Hospital in a comatose condition.
JOHN ROLFE, of Buffalo, was cut about the head and face but will recover. Several others escaped with injuries too slight to need particularizing.
The force of the shock was terrible. The long block of buildings adjoining on the north side of the river was shaken as by an earthquake. The windows were all broken and ceilings destroyed. Severeal buildings on the west side of Wells Street were cracked and otherwise damaged. The windows on the river side of the Board of Trade building were all broken and many also in Gilber, Hubbard & Co.'s building on South Water Street. The telegraph wires on Water Street were snapped in several places, and roofs of buildings at a considerable distance from the wreck, were broken by falling beams. The long shed or warehouse on the north side of the river, reaching from Wells and Clark Street bridge, was broken through in many places.
One of the fenders of the boat, weighing about two hundred pounds, was blown through the air, and hurled into the rear of Larrabee & North's dry goods store, over a block from the dock, in its course taking out a circular piece, a foot in diameter, from the centre of an iron shutter.
The Globe was an old boat, owned by Dr. Helmer of Lockport, N.Y. She was valued at $15,000 and insured for $10,000.

Later.
There are many conflicting rumors upon the street relative to the cause of this terrible disaster, but the true one, as near as we can ascertain from conversations with the captain and mate, is this:
The engineer had received orders to get up steam on the donkey engine, to hoist out freight. The boiler was exceedingly hot, and but a trifling amount of steam on. The pumps were set at work, and the cold water pumped in at once caused the explosion.
The total number of the victims to this new calamity will probably reach fifteen.
The captain informs us that the two engineers, four firemen and three deck hands are msising, and undoubtedly lost. This would give a total loss of fifteen.

Milwaukee Daily Sentinel Wisconsin 1860-11-10

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