Hog Island, VA Tug JAMES BOWEN Sinks, Mar 1899

TEN BRAVE SAILORS FIND WATERY GRAVES.

THE TUG JAMES BOWEN SINKS WITH ALL ON BOARD.

EFFORTS OF THE DREDGE ADMIRAL TO SAVE HER PROVE FRUITLESS.

THE LATTER, ADRIFT AND HELPLESS, TOWED TO NORFOLK BY THE GERMAN STEAMSHIP ALBANO.

Norfolk, Va., March 8. -- Capt. Charles G. Cannon, of Camden, N.J., of the steam dredge Admiral, which arrived here tonight, told the story of the loss at sea of the tug James Bowen, of Philadelphia, and the drowning of ten men on board. The dredge, towed by the Bowen, called from Norfolk on Thursday last for Philadelphia, the headquarters of its owners, the North American Dredging Company.
The tug and tow lay in Hampton Roads until Monday morning last, awaiting fair sailing weather.
At 10 o'clock a start was made. At 9 o'clock that night, when off Hog Island, it began to blow a gale and the tug, with her tow, put back for harbor in Hampton Roads. Two hours later the wind abated and an attempt to anchor was made. This failed and as the wind had begun to blow from the southwest it was thought best to turn back again and proceed toward Delaware Breakwater. The sea rose meanwhile and at 5:40 on Tuesday morning a wave swept over the big tug carrying both lifeboats away. Shortly after WILLIAM P. CANNON, of the Bowen, fearing to longer attempt to tow the dredge, cut the hawser and the tug put back for Hampton Roads. She circled about the dredge while instructions were shouted back and forth. Suddenly, when about four hundred feet distant from the Admiral, a great wave rolled over her and she went down with all on board.
The lost are:
WILLIAM P. CANNON, of Philadelphia, Assistant Superintendent of the American Dredging Company, who leaves a widow and three children.
JAMES E. BOWEN, captain of the tug, whose wife and six children reside in Camden.
THOMAS CRUMP, chief engineer, whose wife and child reside in Camden.
Second Engineer SAMUEL FOWLER, who leaves a wife and two children in Camden.
Pilot PHILLIPS, of Philadelphia.
Mate CHARLES COULISON.
Fireman MATT SPIGLE, of Camden.
Fireman COOK.
Two sailors whose names are unknown.
The German steamship Albano, Captain Julius Kudelbold, from New York for Newport News, sighted the dredge on Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock and stood by her until 9 this morning, when she sent a boat and took the crew off the dredge. In an attempt to do this on Tuesday evening, the steamer's boat was capsized and the second mate, whose name is unknown, was drowned. The Albano landed the survivors at Old Point tonight, whence they came to Norfolk.

The Times Washington District of Columbia 1899-03-09