Brooksville, VT Train Collision, Aug 1889

IN HIS CAB -- ENGINEER EMERY MET HIS DEATH.

TWO OTHERS KILLED AT RUTLAND.

EXCURSION TRAIN COLLIDES WITH A FREIGHT.

BOTH ENGINES LEAPED INTO THE AIR.

NINE CARLOADS OF HOGS BURIED IN THE DEBRIS.

Middlebury, Vt., Aug. 31. -- An excursion train to Burlington, from the horse breeders' meeting at Rutland, over the Central Vermont railroad, and a stock train bound South collided at 8:30 last night, four miles north of here, near Brooksville.
Both engines, one car and part of another of the excursion train and nine stock cars loaded with hogs, bound for Boston, were wrecked and piled in a heap.
The dead are:
Engineer WILLIAM EMBRY and Conductor HIRAM BLODGETT of the excursion train, who lives at Northfield.
W. W. ALLEN of Vergennes, whose body was found under the train.
Engineer WILL CHILSON had several ribs broken.
Fireman HENRY PARAN of St. Albans had his right leg smashed, and is badly cut about the head.
Conductor BUTTON was badly cut about the head and has gone crazy.
Three of the stock train crew and CHARLES and ARTHUR HUNT of New Haven, passengers, are injured, the latter seriously.
Among the passengers on the excursion train were Secretary of State PORTER of Montpelier and L. A. DREW of Burlington.
Engineer EMBRY saw the freight approaching, and had brought his engine to a standstill when the collision occurred. He stuck to his post and was killed.
Responsibility for the accident is said to rest with the conductor and engineer of the freight, who forgot about the special excursion train, although it had run for two days previous.
BLODGETT'S and ALLEN'S bodies were badly disfigured by the crushing timbers and the maddened hogs had bitten them badly.
A wrecking train went up from Rutland at 11 o'clock, carrying surgeons and wrecking tools. Another came down from St. Albans with railroad officials and surgeons from Burlington. Middlebury and Brooksville people, however, had cared for the dead and injured with kind hands.
By the glare of immense bonfires made of the shattered cars the work of getting out the mangled hogs was prosecuted. They were at once killed.
A lady who lives in a house near by, and who saw the collision says that both engines reared into the air. The one headed north is pointed south, so great was the shock.

Boston Daily Globe Massachusetts 1889-08-31