Ogden Canyon, UT Giant Powder Explosion, Apr 1896

A DEADLY BLAST.

AWFUL RESULT OF AN EXPLOSION OF GIANT POWDER IN UTAH.

FIVE MEN ARE INSTANTLY KILLED.

A LIKE NUMBER ARE BADLY INJURED -- THREE OF THE DEAD MEN HURLED A DISTANCE OF 300 FEET.

Ogden, Utah, April 9.-- At 5:50 o'clock Wednesday afternoon an explosion of giant powder of station 231 of the Pioneer Electric pipe line, in Ogden Canyon, resulted in the death of five men and the injury of five others. The following is a list of the killed:
D. MORAN, foreman.
JEFF RUBY.
BRIG KIRKHAM.
G. WEAVER.
NATE KEMPTON.
The injured are:
G. N. STETSON, arm broken, internal injuries.
NICK LEANON, bruised and cut, internal injuries.
A. SPROUL, ribs broken, internal injuries.
ALF ELLINGSFORD, face cut, leg broken and internal injuries.
SAM HADFIELD, internal injuries.
There were 30 to 40 men at work nearby and the wonder is that more were not killed. MORAN, KIRKHAM and KEMPTON were thrown over 200 feet, almost upon the bank of the river. The dead and wounded were brought to this city in wagons.
The terrible catastrophe occurred about 400 years above the first bridge in the canyon on the site of a big cut through the point of the cliffs that rises hundreds of feet from the river. Two gangs of men were at work at the time, work for the day was about to close and final preparations were being hurried. Foreman D. MORAN, in charge, was tamping the fuse from which the blast was ignited.
The explosion came like a thunder clap and in an instant the side of the mountain upheaved, and when the smoke cleared away men, rocks, earth and debris had been hurled down the mountain side. Four men, MORAN, KIRKHAM, WEAVER and KEMPTON were instantly killed. RUBY expired while being taken to the hospital in this city.
The cause of the explosion is supposed to have been what is known among rock workers as a "hot hole." It is the custom among contractors to "spring" the rock with giant powder before putting in the blast of black powder. The rock had been sprung three times during the day. The "hot hole" theory is generally accepted, but others claim the explosion was the result of tamping the powderwith an iron spoon.

Stevens Point Daily Journal Wisconsin 1896-04-09