Hooker, TN Passenger Train Collision, June 1902

FORGOT HIS ORDERS.

A FATAL WRECK ON THE N.C. & ST. L. NEAR CHATTANOOGA.

FOUR KILLED AND FIFTEEN OR MORE HURT LATE YESTERDAY AFTERNOON IN PASSENGER TRAIN COLLISION.

OTHERS INJURED MAY DIE.

Chattanooga, June 13 -- A fatal collision occurred on the Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis railroad yesterday afternoon between Hooker and Summit, two small stations about twelve miles from this city. Three men were killed outright, one died after being removed to the hospital, and about fifteen others more or less seriously injured.
Possibly two or three of the wounded will die from the effects of their injuries.
The dead are:
L. A. RANKIN, fireman of the accommodation train.
JAMES BERNARD, fireman of the fast mail train.
Express Messenger BEBB of the fast mail train.
GEORGE ROLLINS, engineer accommodation train, died after being removed to the hospital.
The seriously injured are:
J. W. BARKER, mail clerk, serious.
FRED THATCH, baggage master, serious, may recover.
Mail Clerk MILLER, serious, not fatal.
R. R. STOVER, mail clerk, serious.
A. W. CLARK, mail clerk, will recover.
GEORGE RAY, engineer fast mail.
Train No. 98, known as the Jasper Accommodation, left Chattanooga about 2:40 o'clock this afternoon. It was due at Summit at 3:08. The other train, a fast mail from Nashville, was behind time, and the meeting point of these trains had been changed from the regular station of Summit. One of the engineers, it is said, overlooked his orders and ran past the designated place.
Engineer GEORGE ROLLINS, of Pikeville, Fireman L. A. RANKIN of this city and Conductor R. A. DOSS of Jasper composed the crew of the accommodation train. The fireman was horribly mangled and died almost instantly. Engineer ROLLINS was badly injured, crushed and large holes made in his head and life side. He died later at the hospital.
Engineer GEORGE RAY of the fast mail train is seriously injured and, it is thought, fatally. His left side and head were crushed and other parts of his body bruised. His fireman, JAMES BERNARD, was caught under the smaller engine and literally burned to death. A handful of cinders and charred flesh was all that could be found of him.
Express Messenger WEBB, of the fast main train, was caught under the debris and died shortly after having been removed to a place of safety.
The story of the wreck as told by the passengers on the mail train and a thrilling one of being placed in a position of being able to see the approaching disaster. On account of the position of the track, there being a double reverse curve at the place of the wreck, the passengers were able to see from the side of the cars the approaching accommodation train.
None of the passengers was seriously injured.
J. L. TOMPKINS, of Nashville, the express messenger helper, is dead from the injuries in yesterday's wreck. The report of the death of Express Messenger WEBB was erroneous. He will probably live. It is now thought that the others injured will recover.

Paducah Daily Star Kentucky 1902-06-13