Western Areas, PA Tornado Destruction, Feb 1980

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A tornado leveled a shopping center at about 8 p.m. in Beaver Falls in Beaver County, killing two people and injuring 30, tossing cars through plate glass windows, police and an eyewitness said.
Henry Austin of Bayonne, N.J., spotted the funnel while unloading freight from his tractor-trailer at the Jamesway department store.
"The roof came off the store and just went right down a line of cars," Austin said.
In Crawford County, five people were reported dead in the small town of Atlantic, largely populated by Amish. Police said one woman died at the Linesville campsite in Pymatuning State Park when she was crushed beneath a travel trailer.
State police spokesman Tom Lyon said two were dead in Cochranton and two more died in Centerville, both in Crawford County. Temporary shelters were established in Adamsville and Linesville.
Eight people died in Mercer County when more than 50 homes and 10 businesses were destroyed by a tornado in Wheatland, near Sharon, according to Wheatland Mayor Helen Duby. She said the dead included two children, one an infant.
In Venango County, Lyon said six people died in Cooperstown and a trailer park was destroyed. More than 100 were treated at Franklin Hospital.
State police said two people died in Kane in McKean County. They also listed one dead in Lycoming County and two dead in a Delaware Township trailer court in Northumberland County.
In Butler County, a young girl and her babysitter reportedly died when a house was leveled about one mile south of Saxonburg on KDKA Boulevard, according to Terry Croup, director of the Butler County Emergency Management Agency. He said two others died, possibly in a house trailer, on Water Station Road near Evans City area.
In Forest County, James Hazlett, Jr., son of county Coroner James Hazlett, said seven were dead. All lived in various parts of the county, he said.
National Weather Service Meteorologist Therese Rossi in Pittsburgh said the tornadoes were caused when an unstable and humid cold front pushed from west to east through the area, hitting late in the day when temperatures were warmest.
The weather service tracked three tornadoes that began in Ohio and ended in the Pittsburgh area without causing major damage. One was tracked to near the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport and Coraopolis.

The Indiana Gazette Pennsylvania 1985-06-01