Fredericksburg, PA Plane Crashes Into Blue Mountain, Apr 1936

FIVE DIE AS PLANE HITS PEAK IN RAIN

Men in Army Craft Are Burned
to Death in Accident in
Pennsylvania

SWATH MOWED IN TREES

Machine on Way From Cleveland
to Langley Field Is Destroyed by Fire

FREDERICKSBURG, Pa., April
5 — A big twin-motored army bombing
plane, apparently far off its
course and flying through a heavy
rainstorm, smashed into steep Blue
Mountain tonight, killing its crew
of five..
War Department officials tentatively
identified four of the victims
as Lieutenant Stetson Brown, whose
wings and commission were but a
month old; Staff Sergeant Dendy
and Privates Netz and Tost, all
from Langley Field, Va.
The plane had burst into flames
on crashing through the heavily-timbered
mountainside, and the
charred bodies defied immediate
identification.
The plane carrying Lieutenant
Brown had left Pottstown airport
about 7:30 P . M., bound directly
south for Langley Field, Va. The
spot where the crash occurred is
about forty-five miles west of Pottstown.
Striking 250 feet below the peak,
the craft cut a wide swath through
the trees, then buried its nose into
the mountainside, burst into flames
and burned until only the metal
framework remained.
Dr. S. B. Glick, Berks County
coroner, found the bodies in the
wreckage, two in the front and
three in the rear.

Heard Over Wide Area

Lieutenant Brown took off in a
Keystone bomber from the Ohio
National Guard hangar at Cleveland
Airport with three enlisted
men at 2 P . M., arrived at Pottstown
Airport about 6 P . M., picked
up a soldier believed to have been
Sergeant Dendy and took off amid
a heavy rain about 7:30. He had
been scheduled to reach Boiling
Field at Washington at 8:30.
The crash occurred between 8:30
and 9 o'clock, in the midst of a
heavy downpour, four miles north
of here. Several residents of this
East-Central Pennsylvania area reported
that they heard the plane's
motors and then the sound of the
crash.

April 6, 1936 edition of The New York Times