West Pittston, PA Hoisting Cage Accident, Mar 1905

SEVEN MINERS KILLED.

HURLED TO DEATH IN WEST PITTSTON MINE BY BREAKING OF CABLE.

THE BODIES HORRIBLY MANGLED.

MEN HAD FINISHED DAY'S WORK AND WERE RETURNING TO SURFACE WHEN DISASTER OCCURRED -- CABLE WEAKENED BY EXCESSIVE USE.

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., March 10. -- By the breaking of a cable on a hoisting cage seven miners were hurled 200 feet to the bottom of the Clear Spring Coal Company's shaft, at West Pittston. The bodies of all the men were horribly mangled, many of them beyond recognition. From what can be learned at this time, no blame can be attached to any of the employes for the awful disaster. It was thought by those who claim to know that the rope or so-called cable became weakened by excessive use. The men had finished their work for the day and had boarded the mine cage to return to the surface, and when about 200 feet above the bottom of the shaft the cable gave way and they were instantly killed. They were all Lithuanians, with the exception of GEORGE HAAS, who was a German, born in this country.
The dead are:
ANTHONY CHERPOLIS, married, leaves wife and three small children.
ADAM KANANBOSKY, single.
STANLEY BLADDIS, married, leaves a wife.
ADAM GASIONIS, single.
MICHAEL JANKASKY, married, leaves a wife and four children.
STANLEY JANKASKY, married, leaves a wife and one child.
GEORGE HAAS, married, leaves a wife and three children.
As soon as the accident was made known, Mine Inspector McDonald and other inspectors who were not far off hurried to the scene, and at the risk of their own lives entered the shaft and found the mangled remains within an hour. The bodies were brought to the surface, where they were awaited by hundreds of grief-stricken people, many of whom gave a lending hand in having them removed to the nearest undertaker. The grief of the wives and children of the dead men was heart-rending.

Tyrone Daily Herald Pennsylvania 1905-03-10