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Baptiste Creek, ON Frightful Train Collision, Oct 1854

There could be no possible blame attached to the conductor, Mr. Nutter, or the engineer, Mr. Thos. Smith, of the express train. The fault lay with the engineer of the gravel train, who should have known whether the express had passed before coming upon the track. His name has not yet been found out, as he immediately left the ground.
Since writing the above, we learn that 11 more have died, making 58 now dead. We also learn that the following list, which was furnished the Tribune by W. O. Ruggles, of Vermont, comprises nearly all saved from the fearful collision.
Here follows a list of about 120 of the saved, which we perceive embraces Thomas F. Meagher and Orestes A. Brownson.
Dr. Watson and family, of Williamsburg, were on the 11 o'clock train, and rendered great assistance to the wounded.

List of Wounded and Dead, As Far As Could Be Learned.
GEORGE HESTTER, German, badly injured.
CHARLOTTE M. SIPE and child, Chicago, do.
FRANCES and JOHN GALLIGER, Ireland, do.
CHARLES COBOLL, Germany, do.
J. W. SONGHAY, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., leg broken.
PETER, ELLEN GALLIGER & baby, dead.
JAMES FERMOY, fireman, knee hurt.
Engineer, badly scalded.
THOS. M. BOSHART, Penn., badly hurt.
GEORGE BOSHART, Williamsport, do.
CATHARINE BOSHART, Williamsport, do.
MARGARET WATSON, Courtland County, do.
HARRIET MARIA WATSON, Courtland County, do.
Three colored men, dead.
One child, parents dead, slightly injured.
JULIUS ROBERTS, badly injured.
ELIZA and THO. BOSHART, slightly injured.
One body, seven years old, slightly injured.
The latest intelligence says that the dead and wounded have been taken to Chatham, where they will receive all proper attention.
We learn from Mr. Weed, of the firm of E. P. Furman & Co., N. Y., that Mr. Randall Watson, of Courtland County, was detained at the Suspension Bridge, to look after baggage and came with him on the following train, and witnessed the heart-rending sight of his wife with both legs broken and otherwise injured, his daughter badly injured, his son with leg broken, and one or two other members of his family lying dead and mangled in the ruins.
Dr. Jackson, of Hartford County, Conn., who providentially came up on the morning train, was unremitting in his exertions to alleviate the sufferings of the wounded and dying.
[Detroit Adv.]

The Perrysburg Journal Ohio 1854-11-04

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