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Long Point, ON (Lake Erie) Steamer WOCOKEN Wreck, Oct 1893

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THE SAD STORY OF DEATH ON THE LAKE STILL CONTINUES.

THIRTEEN MORE VICTIMS CLAIMED BY THE STORMS.

THE WOCOKEN OF CLEVELAND, O., WENT DOWN IN THE WILD TEMPEST WITH PRECIOUS SOULS ON BOARD -- A LADY LOST -- LIST OF THE DROWNED.

Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 17. -- Thirteen more victims have been added to the list of fatalities resulting from the gale that swept the great lakes. The steamer Wocoken, of Cleveland, foundered in ten fathoms of water just above Long Point on the northern coast of Lake Erie.
The list of those on board who were drowned is as follows:
ALBERT MESWALD, captain, Marine City.
MISS SARAH MESWALD, his sister.
Captain JOHN MITCHELL, Cleveland.
Captain DAVID JONES, first mate, Cleveland.
MATTHEW HASLOR, second engineer, Marine City.
MICHAEL HINKELMAN, chief engineer, Cleveland.
CHARLES MINARD, steward, Marine City.
HENRY BRANCH, watchman, Marine City.
JOHN HINKELMAN, fireman, Marine City.
GEORGE SMITH, fireman, Marine City.
EDMUND ELDREDGE, watchman, Marine City.
MIKE KENNY, deckhand, Marine City.
WILLIAM FATCH, wheelman, Marine City.
The following were saved:
J. P. SAPP, second mate.
ROBERT BROWNING, deckhand.
J. H. RICE, wheelman, Cleveland.
The last few weeks of the navigation season of 1893 will live long in the memory of the late mariners, for no such awful list of fatalities has been known in shipping circles for a decade as the one to which additions are being made daily, as reports come in giving details of the terrific gale that swept the inland seas steadily for more than forty-eight hours at the close of last week. The story of the fate of the Dean Richmond in Lake Erie and the Minnehaha in Lake Michigan is supplemented by the news of the loss of one of two lives from a number of vessels composing the lake fleet and now comes the loss of the Wocoken with its cargo of human souls. The Wocoken was bound from Ashtabula to Duluth with a cargo of coal. She sailed on Friday and must have encountered the storm at the height of its severity while making for shelter, as was the case with the Dean Richmond. Long Point on the north of Lake Erie was the haven sought by both vessels but both became prey to the dangerous coast along that part of the Canadian border. The Wocoken made her way up to Erie with safety. There she picked up her consort, the Joseph Paige and proceeded up the lake. She was well out into the lake before she was struck by the storm.
The Wocoken was owned by John Mitchell, of Cleveland, and was valued at $56,000; insured with Smith, Davis & Co., of Buffalo; David Vance, Milwaukee, and C. A. McDonald & Co., of Chicago. Her cargo os 1,800 tons of coal, consigned to W. L. Scott & Co., was valued at $10,000.

Steubenville Herald Ohio 1893-10-20

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