Mino Junction, OH Passenger And Freight Train Collision, Aug 1878

TERRIBLE SMASH-UP.

FEARFUL COLLISION OF A PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAIN IN OHIO.

TWELVE PERSONS KILLED AND MANY INJURED.

PARTICULARS OF THE DISASTER.

Cincinnati, Aug. 7. -- It is reported from Steubenville that No. 6 passenger train west on the Pan Handle road, collided with a freight train this morning near that place, causing the death of ten or twelve passengers, and wounding twenty-five more.

Later.
Pittsburg, Aug. 7. -- The fast train on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad, which left here at 11:45 last night, met with a terrible accident at a point one and a half miles west of Mino Junction, Ohio. The train was composed of two sleepers, one hotel car, one baggage and two postal cars, and two cabooses, the latter being occupied by emigrants. At 1 A.M., at the point named, the fast train, which was twenty minutes behind time and running at a rate of forty miles an hour, collided with a freight train. The entire train, except the hotel car and sleepers, was thrown from the track and fearfully wrecked. Eleven or twelve persons are reported killed, and fifteen to twenty seriously wounded. No names have yet been received. All passengers on the sleepers escaped without serious injury. The loss of life was confined to those in the forward cars, occupied by postal clerks and emigrants.
The Cincinnati postal car was thrown over an embankment thirty feet high, and completely demolished. The postal clerks, FRANK D. GRAHAM, A. W. ANDREWS and W. JOHNSTON, were killed. GEO. L. MOOREAN had a leg broken. The St. Louis car was thrown over an embankment on its end and badly wrecked. The postal clerks, G. W. WEST, W. H. HOUSTON and G. C. MATTHEWS, were injured, but it is supposed not fatally. The baggage and emigrant cars were thrown from the track and badly wrecked, while the last coach and sleepers remained on the track and the occupants escaped almost unhurt.
Owing to the fact that most of the killed and wounded are emigrants, great difficulty is experienced in getting a list of casualties. The killed and wounded were taken on a special train to Steubenville, Ohio, where officers of the road did everything in their power to make the wounded comfortable. Both public and private houses were opened to receive them, and they received the attention of the best physicians of the town.

Oshkosh Daily Northwestern Wisconsin 1878-08-07