Leroy, NY Train His Auto At Crossing, May 1922

3 DEAD, 36 HURT IN LEHIGH WRECK.

BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS CRASHES INTO AUTOMOBILE NEAR LEROY, N. Y.

RUNNING 70 MILES AN HOUR.

TRAIN BUCKLES IN CENTRE AS PARTS OF AUTO ARE CARRIED BACK UNDER WHEELS.

Leroy, N.Y., May 13. -- Collision with a small touring automobile wrecked the Black Diamond Express of the Lehigh Valley Railroad at 10:30 A. M. today and resulted in the death of three persons and the injury of between thirty-five and forty.
The train, making seventy miles an hour, hit the automobiles, driven by THOMAS R. BRODIE of Leroy, at the North Leroy crossing of the State road. BRODIE was instantly killed. His automobile was picked up on the fender of the locomotive, where it had been carried for about 300 yards. Part of the automobile got under the locomotive's fender and jammed the front wheels. This and the sudden application of the emergency brakes caused the train to buckle near the centre.
Three day coaches in the middle of the train left the rails and plunged down a thirty-foot embankment, overturning in the ditch below. One Pullman car directly behind these coaches jumped the tracks, but halted at the edge of the embankment. The engine, baggage car, diner and the other Pullmans remained on the tracks.
Drove In Front Of Train.
E. G. MOSIER of Buffalo, engineer of the train, said he saw the automobile approaching the tracks when the train was half a mile from the crossing. He immediately sounded the whistle, he said, and expected that the driver would stop, as he apparently had a clear view of the tracks, but just before the train reached the crossing the automobile was driven on the tracks, directly in its path. The locomotive hit the automobile squarely and hurled the body of the driver a hundred feet away.
The engineer believed the jamming of the automobile under the front wheels brought the train to so sudden a stop that the coaches buckled. Emergency brakes would not have had that effect, he declared.
Other railroad men expressed the opinion that few passengers would have been saved had the coaches not been of steel construction. In the V-shaped pile which they made in the ditch these railroaders said, coaches of the older type would have been crushed into a shapeless mass.
Motor cars and trucks were pressed into service to carry the injured to Batavia, where the hospitals were filled with victims of the wreck. Physicians and nurses from Buffalo were called to help care for the wounded.
Lists of Dead and Injured.
The list of dead includes:
THOMAS R. BRODIE, Le Roy.
L. E. CLAY, traveling salesman, Portland, Me.
E. E. CORSER, yardman, Niagara Falls.
Those recorded as injured are:
MRS. BLANCHE BARASKEWITZ, Detroit.
JOHN P. BURKE, Buffalo.
MRS. BARBARA CHEHOSKI, and seven-year-old aon, Freeland, Pa.
D. A. CHIFRO, North Tonawanda.
C. WILLIS COX, Detroit.
MRS. DRENNAN, Detroit.
MRS. ERTNA, Rochester.
CYRUS FIELD, Niagara Falls.
HOWARD GOULD, negro, Philadelphia.
JOHN HUMPHREY, Buffalo.
STANLEY JOSEPH, Edwardsville, Pa.
MRS. FRANCIS KORPINSKI, Ironwood, Mich.
RICHARD EDWARDS LISLE, Broome County.
JOSEPH MASON, Philadelphia.
E. W. MILLER, Towanda, Pa.
MRS. E. W. MILLER, Towanda, Pa.
FRANCES MILNER, Niagara Falls, Ont.
MRS. FELIX O'ROURKE, Seneca Falls.
MRS. J. S. PEARSON, Philadelphia.
FRANK RASTAETTER, Buffalo.
MRS. FRANK RASTAETTER, Buffalo.
JOSEPH RIGLETS, Detroit.
MRS. JOSEPH RIGLETS, Detroit.
C. SACCAMANNS, Buffalo.
CHARLES SHENK, Tonawanda.
RUTH SHERRER, Temple.
ROBERT SOUGH, negro porter.
ROBERT STEVENSON, porter.
MRS. CLARABEL TRACY, Detroit.
MRS. ROSABEL TRACY, Geneva, N.Y.
JOSEPH S. TWARBOSKY, Edwardsville, Pa.
SAMUEL WAITER, Jersey City, N.J.
FRANCIS WELMER, Niagara Falls.
There are also two unidentified women among the most seriously injured, both of whom may die. East is about 50 years old. One wears a wedding ring with the initials "N.D." The other's wedding ring is marked "R.O.B. to L.R.W., November, 1920."
Pullman Passengers Escape.
None of the passengers in the Pullmans was injured. W. J. McGARRY, manager of the American Railway Association at Washington, who was in the chair car immediately back of the day coaches, was the first person to leave the train. He gave assistance to a woman who had been thrown through a car window. He said that in his opinion the wreck was caused by part of the automobile being carried along with the trucks under the smoker and coming in contact with a switch point.
There was wild confusion among the passengers as the cars went over the embankment. Word was at once telephoned to the nearest stations and physicians were sent from Batavia and Leroy. A special train was also made up at Buffalo. A large number of the wounded were taken to Batavia by automobiles before the relief train arrived.
F. E. CLAY of Portland, one of the dead, boarded the train at Batavia, the last stop before the wreck occurred. He died after being taken to Batavia. MR. CLAY was a representative of the Curtis Publishing Company.
The Black Diamond was wrecked near the scene of today's accident on the night of Aug. 6, 1901, resulting in the injury of eight persons.

The New York Times New York 1922-05-14