Off Southampton Long Island, NY Wreck Of The CIRCASSIAN, Dec 1876

WRECK OF THE CIRCASSIAN.

Liverpool Journal -- 6th, Jan 1877.

Shipping -- Wreck of the Circassian.

Owners of the vessel wrecked off Long Island, received a telegram that the vessel had broken up and lives were lost.

Those lost:
CAPT. RICHARDS.
3rd Mate, JOHNSON.
Boatswain, SCOTT.
Steward, JOHNSON.
Sailmaker, FREEMAN.
Carpenters Mate, ORR.
Cook, GRANT.
Seaman, JOGADO.
Apprentice, WRIGHT.
Apprentice, NODDER.
Apprentice, WILLIAMS.
Stowaway, McDERMOTT.

Liverpool Journal, Jan. 20th, 1877.
The wreck of the CIRCASSIAN.

TERRIBLE FATE OF THE WRECKING CREW.

The Circassian, from Liverpool to New York, wrecked in the harbor at Long Island, 13th ult, 20 lives lost.

The Circassian went ashore on the 11th December and was placed in the hands of a wrecking company to get her off. The ship seemed to be in a safe position on the beach and CAPT. WILLIAMS and part of the crew remained on board. The men on board had finished on the night of the 15th, all the preliminaries for attaching the hawser with which she was to be drawn off.
During the early hours the wind freshened a little, and the sea began to run very high, about 6, when it began to clear over her. The men, apprehending danger went into the forerigging where they were ordered for safety. All on board, 32 all told, remained thus exposed till the early morning when it was deemed advisable to move quarters, as the falling of the top hamper caused by the rolling of the vessel, made it difficult to hold on.
The crew were safely transferred to the misen, where signals of distress were repeated. All the time the shore was in sight, the moon shining brightly. Fire built by the crew of the life-saving station showed plainly the figures of the crowds on the beach, hurrying to and fro in vain endeavours to aid the men on the rigging.
It was awful suspense for the poor fellows, lashed to the masts and yards of the ship. They saw attempt after attempt made to get them fail. Every effort to get a boat off shore proved futile, each attempt the sea drove it high and dry on the beach.
CAPT. HENRY HUNTING of the life-saving station, now brought a mortar into service and several balls with rope attached were thrown out to the ship. Only one cord reached the ship, its hold was not secure and it fell off. The wind was blowing a gale from the direction the balls were shot, and most fell short of the wreck. Finally an extra charge of powder was rammed in the mortar, the last charge in the magazine of the station.
In terror and suspense the morning wore on, the wind had veered around to the WSW. Before the men had gone in the rigging, the cables were slackened the ship moved only a short distance and continued to strike the bottom, every time she struck the men thought she would lose her masts, to which they were lashed, they were conscious of the danger and impossibility of saving themselves, should the masts go by the board, it being iron, they were unable to slacken the lashing. Some had not securely lashed themselves and among these were the only four saved.
At 4:30 a.m. the misen mast went by the board with a crush carrying the mainmast with it. She was a total wreck, broken in three parts.

The officers and wrecking crew lost:
CAPT. T. RICHARD WILLIAMS.
3rd Mate EVAN JOHNSON.
Boatswain, KEEPP.
Steward, HORATIO JOHNSON.
Sailmaker, JOHN FREEMAN.
Carpenter's Mate, THOMAS ORR.
Cook, THOMAS GRANT.
Seamen, JAMES SCOTT and ANDREW TABAGO.
Apprentices, FRANK WRIGHT, ALLEN NODDEN, and HEDGE.
Stowaway, JOHN McDERMOTT.
The remaining victims were employees of the wrecking company and Indians.

Liverpool Journal England 1877-1-20