Brooklyn, NY Steam Tug ALICE E. CROW Explosion, June 1890

FRIGHTFUL BOILER EXPLOSION ON A STEAM TUG.

FOUR MEN BLOWN INTO ETERNITY.

THE BODY OF THE CAPTAIN FOUND ON THE DECK OF A SCHOONER SOME DISTANCE FROM THE SCENE OF THE EXPLOSION.

New York, June 24. -- The steam tug ALICE E. CROW, lying at the pier at the foot of Vanbrunt Street, South Brooklyn, Monday morning was blown to pieces by the explosion of the boiler and four of the five men asleep in her cabins were instantly killed. The boat made a trip to the fishing banks with a party of compositor employed on the Brooklyn papers and on its return here put up at the Vanbrunt Street wharf. The fires were banked and the engineer and mate went ashore with instructions to return at 8 o'clock in the morning. Shortly afterward Capt. SQUIRES, Steward GEORGE ROGERS and two firemen returned to their bunks just behind the engine room.

At dawn MATTHEW BARTLEY, a deck hand, reported for duty and found the crew still asleep. He prepared the fire, and after a cursory examination threw himself into one of the vacant bunks to await the arrival of the engineer, MATTHEW GOUGHLIN.
He awoke in the water with his legs badly lacerated, and was picked up by a passing tug. Then, according to his own statement, he learned, for the first time, that the tug had blown up. The boat, which was considered a staunch one and first-class in every particular, was totally wrecked, nothing but a few fragments being found floating on the water. The force of the explosion was so great that a barge alongside of the tug went to the bottom. The tug was valued at $7,000; insured.

The victims of the explosion were:
Capt. SQUIRES.
Two firemen and the steward.

The body of the captain was found upon the deck of a schooner lying in a neighboring dock, and the body of the steward was taken from the water some distance from the explosion. The firemen, it is believed, went down with the wrecked hull of the unfortunate craft. The engineer, MATTHEW COUGHLIN, had a narrow escape. He was just coming from the dock on his way to the tug when the explosion occurred.

Alton Telegraph Illinois 1890-06-26