Chelsea, NY Train Wrecked By Landslide, July 1906

PACIFIC EXPRESS WRECKED.

NEW YORK CENTRAL TRAIN PILED IN A HEAP BY A LANDSLIDE NEAR NEW HAMBURG.

TWO KILLED -- MORE THAN FIFTY INJURED.

ENGINE TURNS TURTLE AND GOES IN RIVER
RELIEF TRAINS ARE RUSHED TO THE SCENE OF THE DISASTER.

Fishkill Landing, N.Y., July 29. -- Pacific Express Train No. 37, of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, which left the Grand Central Station in New York at 9:32 o'clock tonight, was wrecked shortly before midnight at Tower 53, a short distance above Chelsea, and eleven miles below Poughkeepsie, by running into a landslide which had been swept down from a high embankment by a terrific railstorm this afternoon.
The engine of the flyer was thrown from the rails, and plunged into the river. Fireman MILLS was killed outright, and Engineer EDWARD WELLS, whose home is in The Bronx, New York City, died at the Highland Hospital, Fishkill, soon after he reached there.
Fifteen passengers were seriously injured, and thirty or forty others received minor hurts.
The most seriously injured are:
EDWARD KELLY, of Poughkeepsie, N.Y.; arm broken and one leg driven into the thigh; will die.
MRS. AUGUSTUS HERATH, of Schenectady; arm broken.
MRS. WARREN REYNOLDS, of Peekskill, N.Y.; arm broken and legs lacerated.
OXFORD PETERS, No. 931 Broad Avenue, Schenectady; arms broken.
HENRY TAYLOR, Poughkeepsie; leg broken.
Most of the injured were taken to Poughkeepsie.
All the doctors at Poughkeepsie and this place were called to the scene.
During the afternoon and night heavy rains undermined the embankment on the east side of the tracks, and shortly before the arrival of train No. 37 tons of earth and rock slid out on the roadbed, covering the northbound track. The express train was going at a lively rate of speed when the engine plunged into the mass of earth and stone. The locomotive gave one leap into the air, turned turtle and rolled over into the river. The baggage car, which was the first car of the train, was thrown up against the embankment, the parting of the couplings preventing it following in the path of the locomotive. The heavy trucks of the baggage car and first coach sank into the pile of earth and brought the remainder of the train to a sudden stop. The passengers were thrown violently about the cars.
The body of the fireman was recovered. The engine was completely submerged.
The Poughkeepsie baseball team, of the Hudson River League, which was returning from Paterson, N.J., was on the wrecked train, and many of the players are included among the slightly injured.
HARRY TAYLOR, shortstop, was the only player seriously hurt.
The wrecked train was made up of four Pullman cars, six day coaches, one baggage car, one mail car and one combination baggage and mail car. Four of the day coaches were wrecked.
Superintendent D. B. McCoy, of the Harlem division, was in charge of the relief train that came from New York. On the train were fifty or more trained nurses and a number of physicians. The injured were transferred to the Highland Hospital as rapidly as conveyances could be obtained for them.

New York Tribune 1906-07-30