Niagara Falls, NY Died On Floating Ice, Feb 1912

DRIFT TO DEATH ON FLOATING ICE.

WOMAN AND TWO MEN DROWN IN NIAGARA RAPIDS.

IN VIEW OF THOUSANDS.

THEY ATTEMPTED TO CROSS ICE BRIDGE, WHEN THE MASS BROKE AND THEY WERE CARRIED AWAY ON CAKES OF ICE.

Niagara Falls, N.Y., Feb. 5. -- One woman and two men, who had ventured to cross the Niagara River near the falls on the ice bridge, were drowned in the whirlpool rapids, two miles below the falls, to which point they had drifted on the ice in full view of thousands who were helpless to render aid, though every effort was made.
Their names are MR. and MRS. ELDREDGE STANTON, of Toronto, Ont., and BURRELL HECOCK, of Cleveland, O.
A great mass of ice broke away and was swept by the current toward the rapids and pool. When the ice broke there were at least eight persons on the ice, but five of these are believed to have gained the shore in safety, some of them a mile below the falls and midway to the rapids.
Two men and a woman did not escape. One of the men floated on a cake of ice ahead of the other man and woman. When the jam started out the fact was phoned to the lower steel arch bridge and to the cantilever bridge, this latter being about 300 feet above the lower arch. Both stand directly over the entrance to the rapids.
Men with long ropes had rushed out from the Canadian and New York ends of the bridges and dropped the ropes down to the river, and then had moved along the deck of the bridge until right over the persons on the moving ice.
The first man grasped the rope and held it fast. The men on the bridge started to pull him up, but when he had been drawn up forty feet he let go and dropped into the river and was lost.
The other man and the woman next reached the rope as the current swept them on. The man caught the rope and seemed to attempt to tie it about the woman, but the current hurried them along and their chance for rescue was lost. They drifted under both bridges into the rapids in full view on the ice. They were seen to sink to their knees and then the waves washed over them and they disappeared in the seething, grinding mass of ice and water.
It is believed that the man first lost was about twenty-one years old. The woman was older. She wore a suit of gray, a white sweater and a big black hat with plumes. Some watchers believed she fainted when the man tried to tie the rope about her.
The current sweeps under the two bridges with great rapidity, and it may be that the rope was too short to allow of the movement of the current during the time he was trying to put the rope around her.
Persons who were near the falls when the jam broke say they are centain other lives have been lost. One man reports having seen a womana leap from the ice into the water near the upper arch bridge.
The thermometer has ranged around zero and the cold was intense in the gorge. For this reason the man and woman who died together must have been benumbed by the time they had reached the point of attempted rescue, for they were drifting nearly an hour.

Gettysburg Times Pennsylvania 1912-02-05