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Warwick, NY Locomotive Boiler Explosion, Nov 1895

WITHOUT WARNING -- FOUR RAILROAD MEN MEET DEATH NEAR WARWICK, N.Y.

LOCOMOTIVE BOILER EXPLODES WHILE RUNNING AT A HIGH RATE, AND THEY ARE FRIGHTFULLY MANGLED.

New York, No. 11. -- A special dispatch to the Recorder from Warwick, N.Y., says:
With an awful roar Lehigh & Hudson engine No. 13 blew up Sunday and caused the death of four men.
The dead are:
HERBERT BEETNER, fireman, Easton.
WILLIAM COOPER, engineer, Philadelphia.
MARTIN O'NEILL, conductor, Belvidere.
JAMES L. SLOAN, brakeman, Phillipsburg.
The force of the explosion was so great that the boiler was thrown from the trucks, but the latter remained on the rails. The train, consisting of 30 cars, although it was running on a down grade, was stopped by the brakeman, but not until it had run fully a mile and a half.
The victims of the accident were hurled in all directions, their clothing stripped from their bodies and the tattered garments fell in branches of trees along the tracks where they remained hanging. The first body found was COOPER'S. It was pinioned under the shattered boiler. He had been crushed to death by the mass of iron and steel. O'NEILL had been blown on the rails and run over by the train, his body cut to pieces and otherwise horribly mutilated, while SLOAN was hanging unconscious on a barb wire fence, 50 feet away. He only lived a few minutes, dying in great agony. Fireman BEETNER was blown out of the cab and landed in an open field 20 yards from the scene of the explosion. His coat, vest and shirt were torn from his back, and when found by the rescuing party, he was wandering in a dazed condition, clad only in his shoes, stockings and trousers. He was taken to Easton, but he did not long survive.
The train, it seems, started from Maybrook without a conductor, at 9:45 o'clock, last night, and ran to Hudson Junction before his absence was discovered. Then the engineer put the train on a siding and ran back and picked up the conductor. Conductor O'NEILL remained on the engine, where he was joined by his head brakeman, when the train was again started. The explosion occurred before the train had proceeded five miles further. No explanation of the cause of the accident has been advanced, but it is supposed to have been due to low water in the boiler.

Stevens Point Daily Journal Wisconsin 1895-11-16

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