St. Louis, MO Tornado Catastrophe, Mar 1871

EIGHT PERSONS KNOWN TO HAVE BEEN KILLED AND MANY MORE SERIOUSLY INJURED -- BUILDINGS DEMOLISHED AND STEAM-BOATS INJURED -- THIRTY FAMILIES RENDERED HOMELESS -- FULL PARTICULARS OF THE CATASTROPHE.

St. Louis, March 9. -- The deaths caused by the tornado which passed over East St. Louis yesterday afternoon, as far as known, are seven, as follows:
JOHN HALPIN, employed on the bridge.
JOHN B. O'NEILL, purchasing agent for the Southeastern Railroad.
JOHN VOGEL.
DANIEL COLLINS.
TIMOTHY DRUMIN.
ISAAC EVANS, engineer of the Chicago and Alton Railroad, burned in the round-house.
JOHN EISLEY, a brakeman on the Toledo and Wabash Railroad.
and a Teamster, name unknown.
Of the wounded, the following are the most seriously hurt:
HENRY C. CREVELING, Superintendent of the Wiggins Ferry Company, right shoulder fractured and head cut by the chimney of the ferry-boat falling across his carriage.
GEORGE SCHONE, master-mechanic on the Chicago and Alton Road, received a terrible cut on the head, and his legs were badly crushed.
MARGARET CONWAY had both legs broken.
MICHAEL CONWAY and two children were fearfully cut about the head and body.
LOUIS PERVIN'S head was badly cut.
L. MARKS, of Nashville, Ill., had his head shockingly cut.
CHARLES PERRY and THOMAS HAMILTON were seriously cut.
PETER FLYNN had a leg broken.
FRANK DONEGAN and wife were badly hurt.
MILTON McFARLAND was seriously hurt.
AARON STAUNUS, agent of Adams Express, had his head badly cut.
HARVEY STOCKMAN, yard-master of the Toledo and Wabash Railroad, had his head terribly cut.
TIMOTHY DONOHUE, of the same road, had his head badly cut.
WM. DENNETT, fireman of the Wabash Road, shoulder dislocated.
WM. HILL, blacksmith on the Wabash Road, head terribly cut, probably will not recover.
PETER PHILIHON, conductor on Pullman's sleeping-car, seriously injured.
LUCY GLASGOW and BARBARA SINCRAFT, seriously injured; the latter will probably die.
MARGARET RICHARDSON and child, injured -- the latter fatally.
MARGARET STOLAN and child, badly cut -- the latter cannot recover.
ELLEN DALTON, seriously hurt.
TIMOTHY HOWARD, of the Chicago Railroad, terribly cut about the head.
ELIZA POWELL, head badly cut.
WILLIAM STARK, pilot of the ferry-boat, seriously injured.
MATTHEW QUINN, of the Vandalia Railroad, arm broken.
FRANK EDWARDS, engineer on the Vandalia Railroad, terribly scalded.
W. T. GAMEY, fereman[sic] of the Vandalia round-house, arm broken.
Those less seriously and slightly injured will outnumber the above. The immense amount of frame-work in and around the eastern abutment of the bridge consisting of derricks and the massive supports for other hoisting apparatus, was blown down like so many reeds. Some thirty families are rendered homeless by their houses being blown down. Most of the latter were totally destroyed.
The steamer MOLLIE ABLE lost her chimney, and the TEPAS all her upper works, which were of iron. The ram VINDICATOR, owned by the Ferry Company, was swept away, and the tug-boat HEWITT, belonging to the Bridge Company, lost her upper works. Capt. MONTGOMERY, of the HEWITT was blown into the river, and rescued, slightly injured. At the sectional docks, on this side of the river, just below the city, the storm carried away the chimneys of the steamer W. B. DANCE, and displaced her cabin several inches, and forced the steamer RUBICON and several barges from their moorings. At the Pittsburg Coal Dyke, on the Illinois shore, the ferry-boat AMERICA lost her upper works, and her pilot, RICHARD JOHNSON, was very badly hurt. Several small houses were demolished at this point.

The New York Times New York 1871-03-10