Joplin, MO Train Crashes Into Motor Car, Aug 1914

39 ARE KILLED OUTRIGHT; 25 HURT IN WRECK.

DEATH LIST IS INCREASING HOURLY.

TRAIN CRASHES INTO MOTOR VEHICLE, AND SCORES SUFFER.

Joplin, Mo., Aug. 6 -- Thirty-nine known to be dead, eight still missing and twenty-five dangerously injured was today's revised toll of last night's wreck between a Kansas City Southern passenger train and a Missouri and North Arkansas railroad gasoline motor car at Tipton Ford, Mo., ten miles from here.
A coroner's inquest into the wreck will be held late today at Neosha.
HERBERT RATCLIFF, Eureka Springs, Ark., brakeman.
FRANK BRADLEY, Harrison, Ark., brakeman.
MRS. C. L. ESHLEMAN, Dewey, Oklahoma.
V. H. EMBRY, Granby, Mo.
L. H. TRUMBAUGH, Neosha, Mo., live stock agent K. C. S.
S. A. NICHOLS, Harrison, Ark., conductor.
MRS. GEORGE JOHANNES, Nevada, Mo.
MRS. LINSLEY AND SON, Joplin, Mo. (Negroes.)
TWO NEGRO CHILDREN.
T. O. LUSCOMBE, Joplin, Mo.
MRS. J. M. HARMON, Neosho, Mo.
DORA AND FAYS HARMON, children of MRS. J. M. HARMON.
BERT JOHNSON, Oklahoma City, Okla.
MRS. LOREN McCLARY, Cartersville, Mo.
MRS. C. L. ASHLAND, Dewey, Okla.
The injured include:
LOVA ESHLEMAN, Dewey, Okla., dangerously burned and bruised.
DORA MAJOR, Seattle, Wash., internal injuries.
H. E. LITTLETON, Harrison, Ark., Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad special agent, fractured ribs and bruises.
W. T. ROWLAND, Valley Springs, Ark., bruises.
ETTA SETTEKY, Morton, Iowa, bruised.
ISA SETTEKY, Morton, Iowa, cuts and bruises.
Thought Track Clear.
With supposedly a clear track ahead, the passenger train plunged at full speed into the motor car which was coming from the opposite direction. Each is said to have been running thirty-five miles an hour. The motor car was telescoped and its gasoline reservoir exploded, throwing burning oil over the wreckage.
The heavy train crushed the motor car like paper and the crash was immediately followed by the fire which spread death and injury to almost every one on the motor.
As the fire spread, groans of the persons pinned under the wreckage could be heard. A number begged to be killed rather than face a slow death by fire.
When the news of the wreck reached Joplin, every available physician and nurse was rushed to a relief train. The injured were placed aboard and brought back to Joplin and tonight the hospitals were crowded. Many of these were taken to Neosho, Mo.
According to reports received here, both the motor car and the train were running at a high rate of speed when they met at a small siding known as Tipton's Ford. With the collision came the explosion of the gasoline reservoir of the motor car setting both the motor car and the train afire. Every person in the motor car was killed, it is stated.
The injured were pinned beneath the wreckage and as the flames reached them they begged piteously to be released. However, the fire quickly spread through the wreckage and made it impossible for those uninjured to assist.
Rescues Victims.
J. J. LAUDERBACK of Joplin, Mo., a passenger on the train crawled through
a window and saved nine persons pinioned under seats. One woman whom he dragged through a window fought with him to be allowed to return to her child which was caught under the wreckage.

Oakland Tribune California 1914-08-06