State Line, MS Train Plunges Over Trestle, Oct 1913

TWENTY-SIX BODIES HAVE BEEN RECOVERED FROM WRECKED TRAIN.

BELIEVED THAT ALL HAVE NOT BEEN TAKEN OUT -- NUMBER OF INJURED SOLDIERS AT HOSPITALS TOTALS NINETY-FIVE.

DERAILING OF ENGINE TENDER BELIEVED TO BLAME.

BAGGAGE CAR AND THREE COACHES LEFT THE TRACK AND PLUNGED OVER A 25 FOOT TRESTLE -- COACHES CATCH FIRE AND BURN FIERCELY -- KILLED WERE BADLY MANGLED AND MANY BODIES WILL NEVER BE ASSEMBLED -- COAST ARTILLERYMEN WERE VICTIMS OF THE DISASTER WHICH HAPPENED NEAR MOBILE, ALA.

Meridian, Miss., Oct. 20. -- At 10 o'clock this morning twenty-six bodies had been taken from the Mobile & Ohio troop train wreckage, near State Line, Miss., according to a telephone report reaching this city. This report said all bodies had not been taken out. The same report gave the number of injured at ninety-five. Some of these are at Buckatunna and some at State Line.

Mobile, Ala., Oct. 20. -- Victims of yesterday's troop train wreck on the Mobile & Ohio railroad at Buckatunna, Miss., were brought to Mobile early today on relief trains. The list of known dead at 8 o'clock was 17, most of whom were members of the 170th coast artillery.
There were 74 seriously injured soldiers in Mobile hospitals, while a number of the less seriously hurt were taken to the government hospital at Fort Morgan. Physicians who arrived on the relief train said they fear at least 15 among the seriously injured could not survive.
The known dead:
PRIVATE JOE LEBER, 170th company.
PRIVATE ERNEST PAQUETTE, 170th.
PRIVATE CLYDE TWEEL, 170th.
CORPORAL FRITZ KOHLER, 170th.
PRIVATE W. H. BRIN, 170th.
PRIVATE G. W. GOODES, 170th.
PRIVATE VAN STEBBENS, 170th.
CORPORAL FRANK T. CHELEWSKI, 170th.
PRIVATE GRUELDRUEHLKI, 170th.
PRIVATE G. C. BURLESON, 170th.
PRIVATE ACRES, 170th.
PRIVATE VIRGIL REMSEN, 39th.
CORPORAL JOSEPH S. JOHNSON, 8th band.
PRIVATE JOS. PROVANCE, 170th.
A. T. KLOVINSKY, 170th.
H. B. BISHOP, 170th.
Investigations of the cause of the wreck continued today. It was believed to have resulted from the derailing of the locomotive tender, which dragged the baggage car and three coaches off the track and over a 25-foot trestle. The injured were members of the 170th and 39th companies and the 8th band. They were enroute from Fort Morgan and Fort Barancas to a state fair at Meridian, Miss.
Additions to the list of seriously wounded officers included CAPTAIN B. TAYLOR of the 39th, in command.
The first section of a relief train from the wreck on the Mobile & Ohio railroad near Buckatunna, Miss., Sunday afternoon arrived here at 2:30 o'clock this morning, bringing seventeen dead and 85 injured. At least five more bodies were seen in the debris and rescue work is being continued.
The following officers were injured:
CAPTAIN FRANK GEERE, 170th company.
LIEUTENANT E. F. BARLOW, 39th company.
LIEUTENANT ROBERT M. CAMPBELL, 15th company.
LIEUTENANT E. M. SMITH, 17th company.
All of the victims of the Mobile & Ohio troop train wreck had not been removed from the wreckage early today, according to travelers arriving from there. They said that at 3 o'clock this morning 23 bodies had been recovered but they were certain more dead and injured still were in the wreckage. Most of those killed were badly mangled and passengers said they believed that many bodies never would be assembled. Arms and legs and even heads are scattered about the wreckage.
The train was a special running as the second section of a regular passenger train on the Mobile and Ohio railroad.
The soldiers were bound from Ft. Morgain for Meridian, Miss., to give an exhibition drill at the Alabama-Mississippi State Fair.
All available physicians, ambulances and dead wagons are gathered at the terminal station here last night, the first named being sent away at 8 o'clock to assist the corps of medical men on the scene.
The wrecked cars are in a ravine, sixty feet deep. The suffering of the injured has been terrible, although the soldiers who escaped injury have done noble work.
The trestle on which the train was wrecked, was destroyed.
The train was running at great speed when the accident occurred.
At a curve on the lofty trestle the rails spread and the entire train pitched into a great gulch.
Almost instantly the wreckage caught fire.

The Newark Advocate Ohio 1913-10-20