Vicksburg, MS Steamer HARVEY BROWN Explosion, May 1896

BOILERS OF A BOAT EXPLODE.

BOTTOM REACHED IN LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES AFTERWARDS.

WRECK MOST COMPLETE.

ELEVEN LIVES LOST AND MANY PERSONS INJURED.

HEROIC WORK BY THE CREW OF A BOAT IN THE NEAR VICINITY ALONE PREVENTS THE DISASTER FROM BEING MUCH MORE SERIOUS THAN IS NOW REPORTED -- CAUSE OF THE EXPLOSION WILL NEVER BE KNOWN.

Louisville, May, 11. -- A special from Vicksburg, Miss., says:
One of the most terrible river disasters of recent years occurred last night about twenty-five miles below this city. The boay, Harvey Brown, of Pittsburg, upward bound, from New Orleans, exploded her boilers at 11 o'clock. The boat was a complete wreck and sank in less than five minutes. Eleven lives are known to be lost including:
NORMAN DRAVO.
WILLIAM BARTLETT, steersman.
WILLIAM DOUGHERTY, chief engineer.
MISS ANNIE C. HESS, chambermaid.
TONI JUDGE, fireman.
WILLIAM WILSON, fireman.
First Mate WILLIAM FITZSIMMONS.
Second Mate PAT CARNIFF.
WILLIAM KELLY, lamp trimmer.
FRANK ADRIAN, of Cincinnati and JOHN WAGNER, of Louisville, are reported missing.
The survivors and also the wounded were brought to this city on the Hanschell. Six of the officers and crew of the Brown are in the marine ward of the Vicksburg Hospital, as follows:
Captain JOHN KIME, hip seriously injured.
WILLIAM GRIMME, carpenter, leg broken.
_____ HARDY, fireman, badly scalded and otherwise seriously injured.
DENNIS J. LUMEY, second engineer, badly scalded and injured internally, will probably die.
Two deck hands, names unknown.
Pilot DRAVO, who was lost, was of Pittsburg and a most excellent man, whose death will be greatly regretted. The bodies of the three dead men, who were brought here, and have been embalmed will be sent to their homes. The tow boat Hanschell was so near the scene when the explosion occurred, that her yawls were lowered at once and were promptly manned and saved many lives that would have been lost if it had not been for their prompt service.
Captain KIME, the master of the Brown, although seriously injured, remained on the after part of the cab inthe roof of the Brown, where he had been blown by the explosion. He was seen this morning by a reporter and said: "The after part of the cabin floated off from the hull, and as it sank to the bottom of the river I directed the efforts of the men who were at work rescuing the boat's crew."
"Myself and Pilot DAN KANE were in the pilot house when the explosion occurred. It would be impossible for anyone to tell how many of the boilers exploded, as the darkness prevented anyone seeing anything."
"I noticed that the hull went down in less than a minute. I have no blame to attach to anyone as the cause of the explosion will never be known, as the chief engineer WILLIAM DAUGHERTY, who was on watch, was lost."
The officers and boat's crew speak in great praise of the officers and crew of the steamer St. Joseph who contributed clothing and other substantials. Captain KIME expects to shend the crew of the Brown to their homes by rail. The coroner here held an inquest on the dead bodies and returned a verdict of accidental death.

Salt Lake Herald Utah 1896-05-12

Comments

The Africa & Severn 1895

This is a message to Stu regarding this article and PICTURE of the ship The Africa. I have a cottage less then 2 km from the site of the Severn. I have only recently learned of this shipwreck and the wreck of the Africa. You have the only picture I have seen of either of the 2 ships. I would LOVE to have a copy of the picture that I can blow up and hang in my living room. I would also LOVE to find a picture of the Severn as it will be the ship that I focus on.
I have started reading the book - The Bruce Beckons - and it gives the best account of everything that took place that evening. From there I spent the week asking my neighbors. I learned that the Severn is located in approx 15' of water, confirmed by people that have seen it. I tried to find it myself but the water was too rough to locate. It is my goal to locate and explore this shipwreck and learn more about it. We have had our family cottage for more then 34 years and never knew this existed...what's more my cottage is located in LARSENS COVE. The cove next to me is Bradley Harbor (or long ago known as Boat Cove). There are only 3 roads where the cottage is...they are named - Larsens Cove Road, Bradley Drive and Silversides Drive. Again up until last week I knew nothing of the history of the names. If you are familiar with the story of the wreck, you will know that it was Bradley that rescued the crew of the Severn. Apparently he was not as generous as some newspaper articles made him out to be. But interestingly enough I have fished off of what is left of his dock ever since I was a young boy. The remnants of his old log cabin still remain hidden in the forest (I'll be looking for it next summer).

Anyhow, if you have any other pictures that you would be willing to pass on I would greatly appreciate it - or other information you may have on these ships.

Thank you for your time.

Peace

Chad