Hope, MN Train Wreck, Feb 1914

Hope MN train wreck 2-1914.jpg

WRECK VICTIMS MAY DIE.

DAVID THOMPSON, FIREMAN, AND CHAS. REINHARD, ENGINEER, ARE IN CRITICAL CONDITION AT OWATONNA HOSPITAL.

INJURED IN THIS CITY WILL RECOVER.

WRECKERS HAVE TRACK REBUILT AND PART OF COACHES BACK ON RAILS. TRAFFIC IS RESUMED.

Hope, Minn. -- DAVID THOMPSON of St. Paul, fireman of Rock Island train No. 60 which was derailed near Hope Thursday, is in a cricital condition in the hospital at Owatonna, and little hope is entertained for his recovery. His back was scalded seriously by escaping steam, so badly that the flesh dropped off exposing the bones, and it is believed his lungs also are injured.
C. W. REINHARD of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, engineer of the ill-fated train, also is in a serious condition. He is suffering from scalp wounds and internal injuries.
JOHN BERGES of St. Paul, a passenger, who was injured about the head, also at Owatonna, is recovering.
The injured that were taken to this city have received the best of care and if no internal injury develops it is believed all will recover without any permanent injuries. The baggageman, E. A. MUCHLNER, of Des Moines, and E. C. NICHOLS, fireman, had recovered sufficiently to go to their homes Friday.
N. H. THOMPSON, manager of the Albert Lea Gas Light Co's. branch house at Fargo, is suffering from a badly bruised ankle and other slight injuries. MR. SHEEHAN, also with the Albert Lea Gas Light Co. at Fargo, has injuries to his back and chest. The two Servians, JOHN BOJOVICH, Chisholm, Minn., with injuries to the back and head, and JOHN VIVKSANOVICH of Hibbing, Minn., with injuries to one of his lower limbs, have continued on the journey.
The big wreckers from St. Paul and Cedar Rapids have repaired the 500 feet of demolished track and road bed at the scene of the wreck and traffic has been resumed. Two of the heavy steel coaches were dragged back onto the right of way by the ponderous machinery and the other two are expected to be in position today.
Superintendent Wallace and officials of the road are on the scene to ascertain the exact cause of the wreck.
At the time of the accident it is reported that the train was exceeding a mile a minute and the supposition is some part of the under structure work of the train came down onto the rails.
Were it not that the coaches were of steel it is doubtful whether a life on the train would have been spared.
Again it has been demonstrated, as we have mentioned in our editorial of this issure, the efficiency of the steel coach in preserving the traveling public's life.

Evening Tribune Albert Lea Minnesota 1914-02-20