Highland Light, MA Schooner FORTUNA And Steamer BARNSTABLE Collide, Jan 1896

NINE SAILORS DROWNED.

THE FISHING SCHOONER FORTUNA SUNK BY A COLLISION.

RUN DOWN BY A BRITISH STEAMER.

FOURTEEN OF THE CREW ARE SAVED -- THE VESSEL GOES DOWN WITHIN THREE MINUTES AFTER BEING STRUCK.

Boston, Jan. 14. -- The fishing schooner FORTUNA, Capt. GREENLAW, from Boston for St. George's Bank, was in collision last night with British steamer BARNSTABLE, off Highland Light. The schooner was cut almost in two, and sank within three minutes. Fourteen of her crew were saved by the steamer, but nine men went down with the vessel. Those drowned belonged in Gloucester, where they leave families.
The lost were:
WILLIAM AKMAN.
ROBERT CHILDS.
JOHN CLARK.
SIMON DIVEAUX.
HARRY EMENEAU.
HARRY MENEFEE.
CRAWFORD MINACH.
THOMAS SEWARD.
WILLIAM TOBIN.

ARTHUR NOONAN, cook on the fishing vessel, was severely injured by broken timbers, and was sent to the City Hospital.
The BARNATABLE is from Port Antonio with fruit for this city. She brought the first intelligence of the disaster when she arrived.
Capt. E. E. PAINE, the commander of the steamer, makes the following report of the collision:
"It was about 7:25 o'clock last night, when we were northeast by east, about three miles distant, from Highland Light, Cape Cod. I suddenly discovered a two-masted schooner directly under out port bow. Before anything possible could be done to avert a collision, we crashed into her just abaft of the fore rigging, cutting a great gaping hole in her which extended far below the water line. I immediately ordered the engineer to keep headway in order that the steamer's nose would remain in the aperture made in the schooner long enough to give those on board an opportunity to escape."
"most of the men on the schooner were in the forecastle, and when the shock of the collision was felt, they hurried on ceck, climbed up the rigging of their vessel, and reached the deck of the steamer. Nine of them, however, were unable to escape. In about four minutes after the collision occurred the schooner drifted away from the steamer, plunged forward, and sank in about fifty fathoms of water. We remained in the vicinity for some hours, hoping to rescue some of the men, but after a thorough search, no trace of them could be found, so the steamer proceeded."
The FORTUNA left the wharf at Boston at 1 o'clock yesterday morning, bound for the George's on a fishing trip. She had a crew of twenty-three men, all told, most of them belonging in Gloucester.
Capt. PAINE stated that the weather was clear at the time of the collision, and that the schooner's jib or forestaysail obscured her lights so that it was impossible to see her from the steamer until too late to avoid collision.
The members of the schooner's crew who were saved left their vessel so hurriedly that they were unable to save any of their effects. They were sent to their homes in Gloucester to-day. The steamer sustained no injury, save the scraping of the paint from her bow.
The FORTUNA was built at Gloucester in 1894. She registered 124 tons gross, and was owned by A. G. HALL of Gloucester. She was fully insured in the Boston Marine Insurance Company for $9,500.

The New York Times New York 1896-01-15