Woburn, MA Loring & Jones Tannery Boiler Explosion, Apr 1895

FIVE MEN WERE KILLED

By the Explosion of a Tannery Boiler at Woburn, Mass,

SIX OTHERS SERIOUSLY INJURED

Of These it is Feared That at Least One Man Will Die - The Boiler Had Been Examined and Pronounced Safe on Sunday

WOBURN, Mass. April 2 -- One of the four eighty horse power steam boilers connected with the large tannery and currying shop of Loring & Jones, on Conn street, exploded yesterday. Four men were instantly killed and one died on his way to the hospital, one will die from injuries and several are painfully hurt. The force of the explosion wrecked the tannery ....

The dead are Austin Clements, aged 85 [35?], head curier [sic] leaves a widow and two children, Patrick McGonigle, 40, oiler, leaves a widow and three children; Frank McMahon, 55, currier, leaves a widow and two children, Patrick Mullaly, 35, fireman, leaves a widow, Patrick Riley, 30, currier, unmarried.

Fatally injured: Octavius Sanders, aged 35, colored night fireman, married. The others injured are: John Kenny, currier, bad scalp wound, Patrick Keefe, currier, scalp wound and several burns, William Randish, currier, hip fractured; James Ryan, currier, burns and contusions; John Tracey, currier, burned about the face.

All the killed and wounded belonged in Woburn.

Parts of the boilers and engines were lifted high in the air, and in their descent practically destroyed all of the plant that had not been wrecked by the explosion itself. The loss sustained or the insurance on the whole has not been stated. The boilers and engines were insured for $12,000.

Lumps of brick and mortar, which had been blown 900 feet into the air, fell on a row of small wooden houses further along on Conn street, doing considerable damage. Bricks went through windows and roofs, landing on beds in which children were sleeping, on tables were persons were eating, and demolishing substantial woodwork as if it were made of paper. About a dozen people in and about these houses were slightly injured. The terror in the neighborhood was intense.

The News, Frederick, MD 2 Apr 1895

Continued