Chatham, MA Schooner WENTWORTH Wrecked, Oct 1904

12 LOST WITH SHIP SHATTERED ON ROCKS.

GALE DROVE THREE-MASTER WENTWORTH ON MASSACHUSETTS COAST AND BODIES OF DEAD WASHED ASHORE AT FEET OF LIFE-SAVERS UNABLE TO AID.

Chatham, Mass., Oct. 14. -- After battling all night on the bar outside Chatham, the three-masted schooner Wentworth, from Hillsboro, N.B., for New York, went to pieces today and eight men, one woman and three children are known to have perished in the wreck.
The men who shipped on the Wentworth and supposed to be lost were:
Capt. E. E. PREDDLE, master, of St. John, N.B., thirty-two years old.
GEORGE CAMPBELL, first mate, of Prince Edward Island, thirty years.
J. J. GODFREY (colored), boatswain, of Grand Cayman, West Indies.
JAMES S. STEWART (colored), steward, of the Barbadoes, twenty-four years.
EDWARD BURNETT (colored), seaman, of the Barbadoes, thirty-two years.
THOMAS FERGUSON, seaman, of Norway, twenty-six years.
JOHN JOHNSON, seaman, of Norway, twenty-four years.
JOHN DILLON, seaman, of Ireland.
The captain's wife and three children were the other victims.
This ship, laden with plaster, came in last night in the teeth of a gale. For three days the wind from the northeast has blown hard and waves have mashed high up on the bar. It was almost impossible for any ship to live in such a storm close to the shore, and when the vessel was seen at Nantucket Light, ten miles to the north, last evening, running before the gale, those who saw her marvelled. Even then she seemed running straight to destruction.
In her cabins the lights were burning brightly and then it was seen that her lights were burning fore and aft.
Down the coast came the vessel. That she was heavy was plain. The waves washed over her and many times those on shore saw her dig her nose deep into the ocean, only to rise again and right herself. The wind was blowing with great violence and the waves, close to shore where she was running, were breaking over her, smashing her cabins and threatening to carry away her decks.
Then the schooner came into the bar. She struck with a force and a grating that could be heard above the noise of the wind and the waves.
Instantly the seas rolled over her and pitched her further up on the rocks. Then there came signals of distress from the vessel.
The men on board were evidently in desperate straits, for they signalled often. Men on sea-going schooners do not signal repeatedly for distress when these signals are answered from shore unless they are in dire need of help.
Then there gathered on the shore Capt. Doane with the rest of the life-saving crew from Old Harbor. Attempts were made to launch a lifeboat. The waves smashed the boat as though it were made of tissue paper. A gun was placed on shore and the breeches buoy was shot out to the schooner in distress.

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