La Grange, KY Automobile Wreck, Sept 1932

Courier Journal newspaper, Louisville, KY - Thursday 1 September 1932

Joint Rites Set for Five Crash Dead

Motor Carried 400 Feet By Train; Victims Members of Same Family

Special to The Courier-Journal

La Grange, KY - Aug 31 - Joint funeral services for five members of an Oldham County family who were killed this morning when the automobile they were in was struck by a Louisville & Nashville passenger train, will be held at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon. The services will be held at the home of Prentice Douglas, one of the victims, a mile north of La Grange. The bodies will be taken to New Castle for burial.

The victims were Walter Douglas, 62 years old; his wife, Mrs. Lula Douglas, 49; Walter's son, Prentice Douglas, 39, the driver, and the latter's two daughters, Miss Mabel Douglas, 20, and Miss Matilda Douglas, 17.

Four of the victims were killed instantly when the automobile, an old touring car, was dragged and rolled 400 feet by the locomotive. Miss Mabel Douglas, taken to Louisville in the baggage car of the train, died three minutes before an ambulance arrived with her at SS Mary and Elizabeth Hospital. She died of a crushed chest. The others had skull fractures, severe cuts and bruises and numerous broken bones.

The accident occurred at 7:05 o'clock this morning at a crossing near Buckner, three miles west of here.

Coroner Koss Giveden of Oldham County, and H. P. Duncan, conductor on the train, living at 4202 Southern Parkway, Louisville, who called the coroner from his home at Buckner, said so far as they could learn, the accident was witnessed only by the engineer, M. H. Everin, 816 Dearborn Street, Louisville, who said the train was almost on the crossing when he first saw the motor and tried to stop the train. The fireman, Harry E. Looney, 1046 Bluegrass Avenue, Louisville, was shoveling coal at the time, he said. The train was travelling at a speed of about fourty-five miles an hour, according to the conductor.

Officials expressed the belief that the motor may have stalled or the driver was unaware of the danger. The crossing, on a private driveway to the home and grist mill of W. W. Clore, affords a clear view of the track for approximately 1,000 feet on either side.

Walter Douglas is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Della Pardo, Franklinton; a son, John Douglas, Franklinton, and two brothers, Webb Douglas, Pleasureville, and Leslie Douglas, New Castle. Mrs. Lula Douglas is survived by a brother, William Lindsey, Campbellsburg, and two sisters, Mrs. John Sutherland, Buckner, and Mrs. Clara Underwood, who lives in Oklahoma.

Prentice Douglas' wife, Mrs. Patsy Moore Douglas, and three other children, Edward, 18; Walter, 16, and Geraldine, were at home at the time of the crash.

Lucinda "Lula" Batts Douglas - KY Death Certificate #062-30682
Find A Grave #65699760

Mable Douglas - KY Death Certificate #039-19137
Find A Grave #65699770

Matilda Douglas - KY Death Certificate #062-30680
Find A Grave #65699779

Prentice Douglas - KY Death Certificate #062-30681
Find A Grave #65699792

Walter W. Douglas - KY Death Certificate #062-30683
Find A Grave #65699818

Courier Journal newspaper, Louisville, KY - Friday 9 September 1932

CROSSING CRASH INQUEST IS HELD

L. & N. Engineer Did Not See Motor Before Wreck, He Tells La Grange Jury

Special to The Courier Journal

La Grange, KY, Sept. 8 - Five members of an Oldham County family who were killed when a Louisville & Nashville train struck an automobile in which they were riding at Clore's Crossing, near Buckner, August 31, "came to their death by being struck by an L. & N. train ," in the language of a Coroner's Jury verdict returned this afternoon after an inquest at the Court House here.

Those killed in the crash were Walter Douglas, 62 years old; his wife, Mrs. Lula Douglas, 49; Walter's son, Prentice Douglas, 39, and the latter's two daughters, Mabel Douglas, 20 and Mathilda Douglas, 17.

Witnesses in the investigation by Coroner Koss Gividen, of Buckner, were M. E. Everlin, engineer, and Harry E. Looney, fireman, both of Louisville, and B. B. Abell, who lives near the crossing.

Mr. Everlin testified he was on the right side of the engine cab and did not see the motor, which approached from the left side, until the train had struck it. He said the bell was ringing, but he did not sound the whistle for the crossing because it was not a public road. He said the train was travelling at forty-five or fifty miles an hour and was brought to a stop about 1,100 feet from the crossing. He said he then aided in caring for the bodies.

The fireman also said the bell was ringing and declared the whistle was not sounded. He said he saw the motor when the train was about 150 feet from the crossing and the automobile was about ten feet from the north rail when he signalled the engineer.

Mr. Abell testified the train stopped 1,180 feet from the crossing.