Waukegan, IL Steamer LADY ELGIN Wreck, Sept 1860

Lady Elgin In Port Lady Elgin historical marker.jpg Lady Elgin etching of disaster.jpg Lady Elgin wreckage site.jpg

The following persons left the Tremont House on Friday evening, and took passage on board the Lady Elgin:
F. A. LUMSDEN, wife, two children, and servant, of New Orleans.
W. GARTH and wife, MISS ANNA GARTH, and MISS AMANDA GARTH, of Paris, Illinois.
F. F. HALL and lady, of Aurora, Illinois.
MR. SEUPTELBEN, of the firm of Smith & Seuptelben.
T. C. HANNA.
MR. PEARCE, of the firm of Goodman & Pearce.
MRS. BARROW.
ISAAC KINGSLEY, of Milwaukee.
JAMES COSGROVE.
MR. FITZPATRICK, of Kenosha, Wisconsin.
MRS. KETTS and four children.
MR. BOND and two children.
JAMES BELLOWS, Mineral Point, Wisconsin.
A. BUCKINGHAM, J. C. POLLARD and lady, Milwaukee.
J. FITZGERALD and lady, Milwaukee.
MICHAEL CONEGAN and lady, Milwaukee.
HERBERT INGRAHAM, member of parliament, and proprietor of the London Illustrated News, and his son HERFERT.
EDWARD WHITE, FANNY BURNS, CHARLEY SMITH, Chicago.
GEORGE MORTON, Superior City.
GEORGE L. SIMPSON, Joliet.
MR. LOCKE, of Sheboygan.
OTTO LEVEMORE and wife, MR. NICHOL, MR. PHILLIPS, Milwaukee.
JOHN HORAN, deputy United States marshal, Wisconsin.
None of the above-named have yet been heard from.

CHICAGO, Sept. 9. -- The following are the additional names of the lost by the calamity:
FRANK CHAMBERLAIN; MRS. SARAH B. NEWCOMB; MRS. THOMAS KENNEDY; MRS. SUSAN HANLIN; MISS ANN BEILGER; PATRICK HANLIN; WM. FOLEY; PAUL FOLEY; EDMUND MALONE; JAMES MALONE; DANIEL O'LEARY and child; STEPHEN CUDDY; HAMES GILVERY; OTTO LEVERES and son; MISS AMELIA LEDDER & niece; CHAS. B. McLAUGHLIN; THOMAS ERISTON and wife; ALICE POLLARD; WILLIAM HAYES; MRS. JOHN LEWIS; MISS AGNES KEOUGH; MARY C. DUFFY; WILLIAM HANLON and three children; GEORGE P. ARNOLD; MR. JOHNSON; GEORGE F. OAKLEY and wife; CAPT. BERRY of the Union Guards; THOMAS BOHAN, wife and child; JOHN KELLY; SAMUEL BROWN; Policemen DEWARS; SMITH; DELANEY; SCHECKER; HOFFMAN, and RICE, the latter with all his family; ANTOINE RICE; MICHAEL MURPHY; N. McGRATH; MARTHA DOOLEY; FRANK CASPER; WM. WILSON; M. REPP; JAS. SMITH; D. DORMER; M. MONAHAN, daughter, and son; MR. O'NEIL; TERENCE CONLEY; ALDERMAN CRILLY and family; C. McCORMICK and sister; C. O'BRIEN and family; JOHN O'GRADY and wife; MR. ROONEY; A. CORBELL; CONSTABLE FAHEY; JOHN HORAN; STEPHEN HOFF; Hugh McGARRY; Constable BARHUS; EDWARD BURKE; GEORGE CHURCHILL; CHARLES EVARTS; CHARLES JOHNSON; MORITZ PARSON; PETER LYNCH; THOMAS SHEENAN, wife and 2 children; JAMES SMITH; PHILIP BEST; JAMES CONLEY; ELI PLANKINTON; AUGUSTUS BISHOP; M. KEEFER, JR.; R. E. COMMONFORD; MR. FITZGERALD and sister; WM. POMEROY; JOHN COSGROVE; HENRY PARSONS; THOS. NEVILLE; PATRICK CONLEY; SAMUEL A. DOWNER; HENRY BISHOP; PATRICK WELCH; EDWARD WARREN; BESSIE FANNING; KATE FANNING.
All the above are of Milwaukee.
BRIDGET FOLEY; L. S. MINSTON and wife; MARGARET CODD and BRIDGET CODD, of Chicago.
ELIVA CULLEN and ELIZABETH McLAUGHLIN, of Watertown.
No accurate list or number of the persons on board can be given, but the following estimate is supposed to be nearly correct:
The excursion party comprised 300; the regular passengers 50; steamer's crew 35 – making a total of 385. Of these but 98 are saved, leaving the number of lost 287.
Captain MALOTT, of the schooner Augusta, states that when he first discovered the steamer's lights, both red and white, he supposed her to be from a quarter to a half a mile distant, and steering northeast. It was raining very hard at the time. We kept our vessel on her course, east by south, until we saw a collision was probable, when we put the helm hard up, and struck the steamer two or three minutes afterwards, just shaft the paddle box on the port side.
The steamer kept on her course, her engine in full motion. Headed the Augusta around north alongside the steamer, but they got separated in about a minute, when the Augusta fell in the trough of the sea. All the head gear, jib boom, and stern chains were carried away. We took in sail and cleared away anchor supposing the vessel would fill. After clearing the wreck we got up the foresail and we succeeded in getting before the wind and stood for land. We lost sight of the steamer in five minutes after the collision.

Continued