Long Island Sound, CT Steamer GLEN ISLAND Burns, Dec 1904

LIVES LOST ON BURNING STEAMSHIP.

FIRE BREAKS OUT ON STARIN LINER GLEN ISLAND AND OF THIRTY-ONE PERSONS ABOARD ONLY TWENTY-TWO ESCAPE.

OFFICERS AND CREW PLAY HEROIC PARTS.

TWO PASSENGERS PERISH ALONG WITH SEVEN MEMBERS OF VESSEL'S FORCE.

New York, Dec. 17. -- By the burning of the Starin line steamship Glen Island in Long Island Stound today nine lives were lost and property roughly estimated at a quarter of a million dollars was destroyed. That more lives were not sacrificed was undoubtedly due to the personal courage of the officers and crew and the excellent discipline maintained when a horrible death for all seemed almost a certainty. When the steamer was abandoned she was flame swept from stern to stem and yet the only persons who lost their lives were those whose escape had been entirely cut off by the fire before the alarm reached them.
Of the thirty-one persons, inculding ten passengers, who sailed away on the Glen Island last night, twenty-two, including eight passengers were brought back today.
The Dead:
Hebrew woman, believed to be MRS. ROSA E. SILKEN, about 60 years of age, thought to live in New Haven.
Unknown man, supposed to be a New Yorker.
W. E. HENDRICKSON, assistant engineer.
LUMAN MILLER, fireman.
FRANK BUSH, fireman.
JOHN BURKE, fireman.
PETER BENSON, deck hand.
OTTO L. ALFORAN, fireman.
O. BERG, deck hand.
Among the passengers rescued were:
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick B. Street, New Haven.
Two daughters of the Streets.
Max Levin, New York.
Nathan Dubin, New Haven.
Arthur Wallace, Wallingford, Conn.
The Glen Island left her dock last night for New Haven. The trip down through the Sound was without incident. About midnight when about three miles west of Greenwich, Conn., there came a rush of stifling smoke from the hold and every electric light on board the craft was extinguished.
Captain McAllister sent in the alarm for fire drill, and the men came tumbling out of their bunks. In the meantime the steering gear had been blocked and the pilots, finding themselves unable to direct the course of the steamer, hurried to the assistance of the other members of the crew in saving lives. Captain McAllister ordered Pilot McMullen to go to the hurricane deck and loosen one of the boats, while he went to the main deck and tried to loosen the two large lifeboats.
Captain McAllister managed to loosen the port lifeboat. The other lifeboat was frozen to the deck, but a smaller one was soon ready to be lowered away.
While the officers and crew were working there was a scene of confusion among the ten passengers. They ran about the saloons in disarray. The woman who lost her life had been aroused by the stewardess and was on her way to one of the boats when she suddenly turned and dashed back into the flaming cabin. In the large boat fifteen people were afloat. They included the eight rescued passengers and seven of the crew, including the captain. The smaller boat, which Pilot McMullin had managed to free, carried seven passengers. The two boats were rowed as far away from the burning steamer as was necessary to escape destruction, and waited there and watched the boat burn.
The tug Bully came to the rescue and ran in as close as possible, but nothing could be seen of the nine missing persons and all hope for saving them was given up. Those in the lifeboats were taken aboard, and the tug headed for New York.
According to First Mate Larsen, the fire broke out in the forward part of the steamboat when she was off Captain's Island. Larsen declares that it seemed to have gained a headway which it was hopeless to attempt to fight and in a few minutes the entire vessel was ablaze.

San Francisco Call California 1904-12-18