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Eden, CO Train Disaster - Aftermath of Wreck

AFTERMATH OF THE WRECK

Pueblo, Colo., Aug. 9. -- Of the 153 passengers known to have been on the ill-fated Missouri Pacific flyer that was wrecked at Eden Sunday, 80 dead have been identified at the morgues, while two yet remain unidentified. Thirty-two are positively known to be missing, and one other is reported as probably among the missing.

Pueblo, Aug. 9. --- The total number of identified bodies recovered from the Eden wreck at this hour is 73; unidentified 3. The list of missing has been increasing all day, and has now reached nearly forty. One searching party is still out near the scene of the wreck.

The organized searching parties which scoured the river for miles today, in the hope of finding remaining bodies of victims of the wreck reported tonight having found seven more bodies. The last to be identified are:
DR. W. F. MUNN, Pueblo.
THOMAS O'BANNON, Pueblo.
J. Q. THOMAS AND WIFE, Pueblo.
A. M. SCHMIDT, Denver.
L. A. STEVENS, ________.
MRS. DOWNING AND DAUGHTER CARRIE, Colorado Springs.
MISS ALICE SHOUP, Fort Wayne, Ind.
W. B. SALISBURY, cattleman, Sterling, Colo.
MISS JEANNETTE SHERMAN, of Carthage, Mo.
MISS CARRIE BISHOP, Pueblo.

A coroner's jury was called which viewed the scene of the wreck this morning and examined a number of witnesses this afternoon. The coroner has issued a public call to all having any information of the wreck to appear before the jury. The examination into the causes of the disaster will be exhaustive, and it is thought will require more than a week to hear all the witnesses that have been subpoenaed. Four railroad men were examined this afternoon before the jury adjourned until tomorrow morning. Their testimony was mainly as to the amount of rain that fell during the storm in the neighborhood of the accident. District Attorney LOW has stated that the matter will be gone into thoroughly and the coroner is endeavoring to secure all the information possible for the jury.

Today every morgue and undertaking establishment was beseiged by anxious relatives and friends. The work of identification is proceeding slowly, for the bodies now recovered are in a bad condition. Many mistakes are being made and in several causes the matter has been hanging in doubt since Sunday night.

After wandering about the scene of the accident ever since its occurrence, WILLIAM M. HENRY, a traveling man whose home is given as Greenville, Tenn., reached Pueblo today. He is partially blind and almost crazy form the hardship and exposure. He had been carried nine miles down the river and had been walking aimlessly about without food or water. He was taken to a hospital, where he is lying in a serious condition. He was carrying his grip when found but is unable to give a coherent account of how he saved it or what happened to him.

S. D. WOOD, wife and daughter of Minneapolis, who were reported to have been on the ill-fated train, have not been found among the victims. They may be among the unidentified.

Durango Democrat Colorado 1904-08-10

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