Globeville, CO Collision Of Interurban Cars, Sep 1920

TEN KILLED, FIFTY HURT IN CAR CRASH.

ELECTRIC TRAINS RUNNING AT FIFTY MILES HOUR COLLIDE ON CURVE IN GLOBEVILLE, A SUBURB OF DENVER, COLO.

Cars Are Telescoped by the Impact and All Ambulances of City Are Sent to Remove Victims of the Disaster.

By Associated Press.
Leased Wire To Tribune.
Denver, Sept. 6 -- Ten persons were killed and more than fifty injured in a crash of interurban line electric cars in Globeville, a suburb of this city, today.
Both cars are said to have been running fifty miles an hour when they collided. The accident occurred near Fifty-sixth and Washington streets.
The injured are being brought to hospitals here.
All the city's ambulances were sent to the scene and the task of removing the dead and injured was begun.
The cars collided on a curve and were practically telescoped.
One of the cars was en route from Denver to Boulder, Colo., while the second was coming to Denver from Boulder.
With an impact heard for blocks, accompanied by the grinding of brakes and the screams of the injured, the big coaches smashed head-on. The Boulder coach polwed fifteen feet into the front of the outbound coach. The cars were so badly telescoped that their front ends were a mass of wreckage.
Those in the front part of the coaches were enmeshed in the wreckage, and great difficulty was encountered by rescuers in bringing out the dead and injured.
At offices of the railroad company it was announced that the outbound car was a special to El Dorado, a mountain pleasure resort, and had the right of way. LAWRENCE C. CRIPPS, motorman on that car, was instantly killed.
The bodies of the coaches were jammed on the front trucks and the aerials were torn away by the impact. As the crews of both cars were killed, the reason they rounded the curve at fifty miles an hour has not been learned. Chief of Police HAMILTON ARMSTRONG and military authorities rushed to the scene. The military took charge of the situation, as the city has been under their control for nearly a month, due to the strike of employees of the City Traction Company.
Chief ARMSTRONG said he knew that eight dead had been removed from the telescoped coaches.

Oakland Tribune California 1920-09-06

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ELEVEN DEAD AND MANY HURT

INTERURBAN WRECKED NEAR GLOBEVILLE ON LINE BETWEEN DENVER AND BOULDER

CARS MEET HEAD-ON

MANY MAY DIE AS RESULT OF INJURIES; WAS PICNIC CROWD.

Denver, Sept. 7 -- Eleven persons were killed and 102 injured in a head-on collision between two Denver & Interurban railroad trains at a curve near Retreat park, one-half mile north of Globeville. Eight of the injured probably will die. Crowded to its capacity and traveling at a high rate of speed, car No. 158, drawing a trailer, which had just left Globeville for El Dorado Springs. Both cars were crowded with holiday merrymakers, many of the passengers on the inbound car being coal miners from the Louisville district who were coming to Denver to attend the Labor day picnic at Lakeside.
The impact telescoped both cars. The front end of car 153 plowed fifteen feet into the front end of the outbound car.
Attracted by the terrific crash, hundreds of nearby residents rushed to the scene. Police headquarters was notified and the injured were taken to hospitals in automobiles, ambulances and patrol wagons.
Passengers occupying the vestibule of the inbound car were either instantly killed or seriously injured. Several, including the motorman, leaped as they saw their peril. Two of those who leaped were killed.
Passengers in both cars were thrown into tangled heaps, several being killed outright. Some were knocked unconscious and seriously injured, while scores received fractures, lacerations and minor injuries.
The police department was notified of the accident by C. C. EDWARDS, a passenger on the outbound car. Rushing to a telephone in the home of ELBERT COURSEY, about 100 yards from the scene of the crash, he gave the first notice of the disaster.
Scenes of wildest confusion followed the crash. Women and children screamed for help. Uninjured passengers worked feverishly to extricate the wounded and dying pinned beneath the debris.
The wreckage was strewn along the right of way for many yards. Motorists and residents helped in the rescue work. Ambulances were sent from hospitals and police headquarters. A squad of soldiers, commanded by Capt. JOHN C. GRAY, kept back the crowds of curious.
Every sort of conveyance was pressed into service to carry the dead and wounded to the hospitals and morgues.
Most of the casualties were among passengers on the inbound car, although few in either train entirely unhurt. Only failure of the cars to topple from the track prevented a much higher death toll.
Use of the brakes by both motormen proved futile. This was said to have been due to the high rate of speed at which the inbound car was traveling.
Conductor G. W. GRENAMYER, 60, the oldest conductor on the line in point of service, was instantly killed when he leaped from the inbound car.

Record Journal Of Douglas County Castle Rock Colorado 1920-09-10