Berry Creek, CA train wreck, Nov 1913

ENGINEER IS BADLY INJURED WHEN PASSENGER TRAIN IS OVERTURNED BY A HUGE LANDSLIDE

NONE OF PASSENGERS INJURED IN THE WRECK

SPECIAL TRAIN OF PRESIDENT IS LONG DELAYED

Oroville, Nov. 6. - Plunging into a landslide which had covered the tracks with tons of rock and earth, Western Pacific train No. 1, westbound, was wrecked near Berry Creek, 23 miles above this city, injuring Engineer John McGraw and Fireman R. A. Jones. The engine was hurled down into the Feather river by the terrific impact with the rocks on the track. The baggage car was smashed and the entire train of six cars was thrown from the tracks, but none of the occupants of the baggage car or of the passenger coaches was injured.

Berry creek, the scene of the wreck, is 23 miles north of Oroville. When the news of the wreck reached Oroville a relief train carrying Dr. E. A. Kusel, the railroad physician, was dispatched.

It was reported from Oroville that Engineer McGraw was badly crushed when the locomotive went over the embankment and that his chances for recovery were slight. Hope is held out that Fireman Jones will recover, as his condition is not critical.

The train crashed into the landslide on a sharp curve about one mile east of Berry creek. The lurch of the engine as it plunged down to the river, which at this point is about five or six feet below the tracks, jerked the tender with it, crushing the baggage car against the wall of rock on the tracks.

Wrecking crews were rushed to the scene from each side of the landslide. Traffic over the Western Pacific was blocked by the wreck all night. It is expected that the tracks can be cleared by this afternoon.

The wreck will probably delay the special train carrying President Benjamin F. Bush of the Western Pacific railroad until late in the afternoon. It was reported at the local office of the railroad that the special train was on the other side of the wreck.

The Evening News, San Jose, CA 6 Nov 1913