Stockton, CA Steamer T. C. WALKER Explosion, Nov 1898

SIX KILLED BY EXPLOSION.

DISASTROUS ACCIDENT ON A RIVER STEAMER NEAR STOCKTON, CAL.

THIRTY PERSONS ARE INJURED.

STEAM DRUM ON THE BOILER BLOWS OUT -- THE CAPTAIN AMONG THE DEAD.

Stockton, Cal., Nov. 27. -- The most disastrous accident in the history of Stockton occurred to-day near Fourteen Mile Slough, when a part of one of the boilers of the river steamer T. C. Walker, which left San Francisco about 6 o'clock last night, was blown out, killing five and dangerously wounding eleven persons, while probably fifteen or twenty were more or less badly hurt. The T. C. Walker is owned by the California Navigation and Improvement Company, and ran between San Francisco and Stockton.
The dead are:
JOHN TULAN, Captain of the T. C. Walker.
W. A. BLUNT, Foreman of Boggs' Beet Sugar Company.
WATSON HENRY, Engineer of the T. C. Walker, Stockton.
MRS. WATSON HENRY, wife of the Chief Engineer.
JERRY DAILEY, Fireman of the T. C. Walker.
FERDINAND LAW, passenger, of Seattle.
The seriously wounded are:
GEORGE V. SMITH, of Boston, Mass., Deckhand. Injured on the back, face and body; scalded.
JAMES CORCORAN, Deckhand, scalded about the neck, hands and face.
JOHN HOLDSBERG, Night Watchman; in a dying condition.
COBATT DOMINICK, Deckhand, scalded on the face; head and back injured.
JOHN BURNS, Deckhand, burned about the head.
G. FOPPIANO, of San Francisco, passenger, in a dying condition.
EDWARD PAUL JONES, Stevedore, hurt on the head and hands.
MARTIN McCAFFERY, Deckhand, of San Francisco, slightly scalded on the head.
LOUIS BRIZZOLINO, San Francisco, wine merchant.
JOHN FIGONI, Deckhand; head cut and back hurt.
Fully ten others, who were removed hastily to their homes, suffered injuries that were painful, but not serious.
The majority of the passengers were in bed when the explosion occurred. The whole forward portion of the steamer's upper works was blown away. The electric lights had been put out, and the escaping steam enveloped the front portion of the boat till it was impossible to see how much of the boat had been carried away.
The screams of the men who were locked in their rooms near the pilot-house were heartrending. Capt. JOHN TULAN had been blown from his bed against the door of the stateroom, and so seriously injured that he could not move. The door could not be forced open, as he was jammed against it. One of the the employes of the boat secured an axe and cut the upper part of the room away, and finally removed him, but not until he was virtually scalded to death.

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