Glendora Station, CA Train Collision, Jan 1906

SCORE OF PERSONS INJURED, SEVERAL SERIOUSLY, IN COLLISION BETWEEN TRAINS SPEEDING AT THE RATE OF A MILE A MINUTE NEAR LOS ANGELES.

SANTA FE LIMITED CRASHES INTO REAR OF A LOCAL.

SEVERAL COACHES DEMOLISHED AND OTHERS TELESCOPED.

ENGINEER'S ATTEMPT TO MAKE UP TIME CAUSE OF DISASTER.

Special Dispatch to The Call.
Los Angeles, Jan. 23. -- While running at a rate of sixty miles an hour the west bound Santa Fe limited, due here at 2:15 o'clock this afternoon, crashed into the rear of a west bound local train from San Bernardino at Glendora Station shortly after 5 o'clock this afternoon, demolishing several coaches, telescoping others and seriously injuring a score of persons. None of the passengers were killed.
The overland was late and had received orders to pass the local at Glendora, the local having been sent out of San Bernardino ahead of the faster train. In making up lost time the limited ran faster than the dispatcher had estimated and before the local had time to draw into the Glendora siding the heavier train ran into the rear end of it.
The escape from death of the passengers in the rear coaches of the local train was due to the fact that the limited was heard long enough before the crash came to enable the engineer of the local train to start his train in an effort to get out of the way. The train men, seeing that a crash was coming, ran through the train and warned the passengers, who jumped off the moving train. The time was too short for the local to get under headway, but the fact that it was in motion prevented a worse wreck than occurred, the effect of the collision being to partly shove the already moving train along the track.
The impact was such, however, that the big Pacific type locomotive on the limited plowed its way into the rear coach of the other train. The wreck is perhaps best explained by a statement made by Engineer Klinehouse of the limited, who was overheard telling one of the surgeons how it happened.
"We were very late and had been told that the local would take the siding at Glendora," he said.
"Thinking the track was clear we let her out and were going faster than sixty miles an hour. I did not see the local until we reached the depot. We were going too fast to stop, and although I put on emergency brakes and reversed her, it was all over in an instant. If that other train had not been moving we would have killed everybody in the rear coach. I and my fireman jumped and were not injured."

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