Mississippi River, LA, AR, MS Flooding, May 1927

Arkansas City Flooded Greenville Mississippi Flooded Break in levee in Louisiana

NEW ORLEANS SAFE FROM RAGING FLOOD AS BREAKS WIDEN.

FIVE RIVERS FLOODING NINE LOUISIANA PARISHES BUT QUEEN CITY OF SOUTH IS SAVED AS BLASTED CREVASSES IN LEVEE WIDEN TO PERMIT OVER FLOW TO CLEAR CITY -- IMPROVEMENT SHOWN IN OTHER SECTIONS OF FLOODED AREA.

MANY STILL IN PATH OF WATERS WHERE VIDALIA LEVEE SMASHED.

New Orleans, May 2. -- While flood and back water from five rivers was reaching out today in nine Louisiana parishes, the torrent flowing through the huge artificial crevasse made in the Mississippi river levee south of here apparently had removed the danger from New Orelans.
Serious situations to the northward were reported with thousands already made homeless and many other thousands now in the path of the floods ready to evacuate when the water approaches.
Some improvement in south eastern Arkansas and Mississippi was reported with the worst apparently over. Officials were turning their chief attention to health and sanitation and to rehabilitation after the flood waters recede.
So stupendous is the task that the Red Cross at Washington appealed to the country to double the five million dollars already given for flood relief. This step was taken after Secretary HOOVER had personally reported to President COOLIDGE on his inspection of the flood area and had conferred with the cabinet committee and the Red Cross.
Reassuring news from New Orleans was given by Major-General JADWIN, chief of army engineers. He declared at Washington that unless some wholly inforeseen circumstance arose the Crescent City was safe.

Red River Smashes.
With the Mississippi waters rushing down into Concordia parish from four breaks in the embankment south of Vidalia, the Red river smashed through its northern bank at Vick, east of Alexandria, inundating a part of Avoyelles parish to the south of Concordia.
Meeting this rushing water is that coming from the Arkansas river in Arkansas. A special weather bureau bulletin said Jones and Bonita in Morehouse parish were under water with Mer Rouge and Oak Ridge threatened and one thousand refugees already in Bastrop.
Arkansas river waters also have reached into Tensas parish, inundating two miles of the Missouri Pacific railroad tracks above Newellton. In Richland parish, the water was reported six feet deep at Bardel with Rayville threatened.
Some water also was going into East Carroll parish and latest reports were that Lake Providence was threatened. Vidalia and Ferriday were in the line of the main Mississippi flood. Strenuous efforts were being made to throw up temporary dykes.

Waters Move Slowly.
The flood from the Ouachita river began moving slowly into Monroe and West Monroe in Ouachita parish and large forces of men, boys and girls were engaged in topping the levees there in the hope of protecting the greater portions of the two cities, whose combined population is about 30,000.
Catahoula parish, adjoining Concordia, also was feeling the force of backwaters, while some two hundred families were obliged to flee from the north side of the town of Moreauville when back waters from the Mississippi, Red and Black rivers rose from two to three feet during the day.
Besides inundating rich cotton, sugar cane and truck lands, the waters have invaded the oil and gas producing sections, both in Northeastern Louisiana and Arkansas. Dispatches from Alexandria said production of both oil and gas producing sections, both in Northeastern Louisiana and Arkansas. Dispatches from Alexandria said production of both oil and gas was at a standstill with more than 150 producing wells shut down.
To the south of this city engineers continued blasting the Caernarvon levee and much of St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes were inundated tonight with more of the inhabitants moving to high lands after failing to heed first warnings to move.

Talk Reparations.
Reparations for the inhabitants of this flooded area will be discussed at a meeting of the reparations committee called for tomorrow in New Orleans by Governor SIMPSON.
Several threatened breaks near Angola were reported with the greatest danger point opposite Natchez, where a huge sand boil threatened to create a crevasse. Several hundred workers were rushed to the place and engineers reported the danger had been overcome, for the present at least.
Below Vicksburg the river was stationary or falling slightly due to the crevasses below Vidalia. At New Orleans the gauge showed a drop of one-tenth of a foot. This was expected to continue as the Caernarvon crevasse was widened.

The Charleston Gazette West Virginia 1927-05-03