Diamondville, WY Mine Fire, Feb 1901

AWFUL HOLOCAUST IN A MINE

Terrible Disaster at Diamondville, Wyo.

THIRTY-FIVE MEN PERISH.

SHAFT OF THE COLLIERY CAUGHT FIRE.

BUT ONE PERSON ESCAPED.

Cheyenne, Feb. 26. -- The worst disaster in the history of coal mining in Wyoming since the Almy horror, years ago, occurred at Diamondville last night, when fire broke out in mine No. 1 of the Diamondville Coal and Coke company. Thirty-five miners perished, and their charred bodies are still in the mine. The fire was first discovered shortly after the night shift commenced work.
But One Man Saved.
Its cause is not known, but the flames made such progress that only one man escaped. JOHN ANDERSON was frightfully burned in running the gauntlet of the flames. He is unable to give any account of the incident other than that he was suddenly confronted by a wall of fire and smoke and, wrapping his head in an overcoat, he ran in the direction of the mine entrance.
First Intimation of Horror.
The first intimation that the miners in the other entries had of the fire was when ANDERSON came rushing into the upper level, his clothing in flames. He fell unconscious, and was carried to the mouth of the mine. An alarm was sounded and hundreds of miners at work in the mines and on the outside rushed to the rescue of their imprisoned comrades. The fires had already made such progress that it was impossible to enter the rooms. The entire night was spent in confining the fire to the two entries, and this morning it was necessary to seal them up to prevent the flames from spreading to other parts of the mine.
Left to Their Fate.
This step was only decided upon after all hope of saving the lives of the men had been abandoned. It may be several days before barricades can be removed and the chambers explored. Superintendent SNEDDEN has made a careful count, and he believes that 35 men lost their lives, instead of 50, as has been reported. The relatives and friends of the entombed miners, who are all foreigners, rushed to the mine frantically, waving hands and crying to the mine officials and miners to save their dead ones. Many women were slightly injured in the crowd and by falling over obstacles in the darkness.

Davenport Daily Republican Iowa 1901-02-27

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