Milwaukee, WI Train Collision, Mar 1892

SEVEN KILLED IN DISASTROUS COLLISION ON THE ST. PAUL ROAD AT WEST MILWAUKEE.

Milwaukee, Wis., March 1. -- The bodies of seven mechanics employed in the car shops of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Road at West Milwaukee are lying in the morgue, mute witnesses to the criminal carelessness of a switchman.
They had just finished their day's work in the shops of the company, and were returning to their homes in the city on what is known as the
"workmen's train," together with about 175 or 200 others who were crowded into the coaches.
The train is due at a point near the Union Station at 4:20 o'clock in the Winter months, as is also the Watertown local, a passenger train run for the accommodation of suburban residents.
The workmen's train was running on a parallel track. When the local reached Eighteenth Street it ran in upon the switch of a short track connecting the parallel tracks.
The trains were running side by side as the local sped in on the little cross track.
EMIL BARTELL, switchman, had left the switch open. The result was that the local, running at the rate of fourteen miles an hour, sped swiftly into the middle coach of the workmen's train, and before the engineer could reverse his machine he had crashed into the centre of the slowly-moving trainload of mechanics.
The occupants of the coach had no warning of the impending danger, and in an instant they were being ground between the sides of the overturned car and the cinder-covered roadbed.
The car was demolished and two others were overturned. A strange part of the accident is that there was only one injured, and that one but slightly.
The work of recovering the bodies was begun at once. Patrol wagons and ambulances were soon at hand and in half an hour all had been removed to the morgue.
BARTELL disappeared, but was arrested at 8 o'clock this evening.
Identified Dead:
STANISLAUS KATAAENSKI.
JOHN GRUNSKOWSKI.
PAUL WAGNER.
ROBERT WIESE.
FRANK PREISS, single.
JOSEPH DERRINGER, single.
JOHN F. DUESSING, married.
The first three were married, the latter being a single man.

New York Times New York 1892-03-02