Hinton, WV Train Crashes Into Landslide, Mar 1907

The Wreck at Hinton

TWO KILLED IN WRECK.

F. F. V. TRAIN CRASHED INTO LANDSLIDE NEAR HINTON.

ENGINEER AND FIREMAN DEAD.

TRAIN FROM WASHINGTON WAS GOING AT SLOW SPEED AND PASSENGERS ESCAPED INJURY -- TRACK WALKER DISCOVERED OBSTRUCTION TOO LATE TO FLAG TRAIN -- TWO VICTIMS SCALDED TO DEATH.

Hinton, W. Va., Mar. 12. -- The F. F. V. train, known as No. 3, which leaves Washington at 11:10 p.m. over the Chesapeake and Ohio, was wrecked this morning about 9 o'clock at a point five miles east of here. The engine struck a slide and left the track. Engineer JOHN W. FLANNAGAN and Fireman MICHAEL QUINN were fatally injured and both died soon after being brought to the city. The train was running at a slow rate of speed and this accounts for the fact that no one else was injured.
The engine, two express cars, and postal car were derailed, and badly damaged, and the forward part of the combination car left the track. The road at this point is double track and the engine tore up both tracks for a distance of one hundred yards, and then turned over across the two tracks. Engineer FLANNAGAN stuck to his post and was caught under the reverse bar and scalded so badly that he died in a few hours. Fireman QUINN was also fatally scalded and only survived FLANNAGAN a few hours. The express messenger, although his car was damaged, escaped unhurt.
The slide occurred just at this end of Little Bend tunnel and at a place which has heretofore been considered safe. The debris came down immediately in front of the train. The track-walker was within fifteen feet of where the slide down was, but had not time to flag the oncoming train. Late this afternoon the passengers and mail were transferred and brought here.
Engineer FLANNAGAN was the oldest engineer on the Chesapeake and Ohio, having been in the passenger service since 1879.

The Washington Post District of Columbia 1907-03-13