Hangman Creek, WA Lumber Train Wreck, Apr 1910

FOUR KILLED IN WRECK.

BROKEN WHEEL IS THE CAUSE.

FOURTH LOCAL WRECK IN A WEEK.

LUMBER TRAIN GETS ALL TANGLED UP -- MEN'S LEGS AND ARMS TORN OFF -- PATHETIC SCENES.

Four tramps are probably dead and eight injured in a freight wreck on the Northern Pacific this morning one-half mile west of the Hangman Creek bridge. Incoming freight No. 602 was thrown into the ditch by a broken wheel on the third car from the engine.
No trainmen were hurt. The unidentified body of one tramp, a youth of about 25, horribly mutilated, has been recovered and the arms and legs of probably three more victims, all tramps so far as is known, can be seen under the wreckage of the sixth car.
The locomotive of the train and the two cars following it did not leave the rails, but the remainder of the train, over 20 cars, loaded mostly with lumber, are piled up in a space of about 10 rods.
When the wheel broke on the third car, according to witnesses of the accident, that car turned sidewise after running several yards on the ties, and the train piled up on top of it.
The train crew, all unhurt, consisted of Conductor R. J. McDonald, George Howarth, the rear brakeman, and another brakeman. Engineer R. J. Lewis and his fireman also escaped injury.
The injured at Sacred Heart Hospital:
GEORGE HARMON, 24, Webb City, Mo., arm broken, badly bruised.
LOGAN SEARS, 41, Milan, Mo., right leg cut off at the knee, arm broken.
CLARENCE SMITH, 22, Webb City, Mo., arm broken, badly bruised about the body.
RAY JOHNSON, 18, The Dalles, Ore., right leg cut off at the knee.
LEE HARMON, 22, Webb City, Mo., arm broken.
JOHN CARR, 18, Chicago, arm and leg broken.
Eight of the injured tramps were immediately placed on the engine and hurried to the city, where they were turned over to the county authorities and sent to the Sacred Heart Hospital.
A tramp giving the name of M. ROSE and hailing from New York, who escaped with a scalp wound, says he boarded the train at Pasco with four other hoboes. He says five of the hoboes escaped the seventh or eighth car back from the engine, a car loaded with 6x6 lumber. It is believed that it is the bodies of three of those which can be seen under the wreckage.
The youthful tramp whose body was recovered has been identified as J. C. BRUCE or HOMER BRUCE. Two letters were found on the body, one addressed to him as J. C. BRUCE, from Scranton, Ia., to Palisades, Col., and the other to HOMER BRUCE to Grants Pass, Ore., mailed at Palisades, Col.
Workers at the wreck believe that there may be more than three more bodies in the debris. It is known that at least three dead are in the wreckage.

Spokane Press Washington 1910-04-14