Chantilly, VA Charter Plane Crashes, June 1994

MEXICAN CHARTER PLANE CRASHES AT DULLES, KILLING ALL 12 ABOARD.

Chantilly, Va. (AP) -- A plane chartered in Mexico crashed while approaching Dulles International Airport in a heavy fog Saturday, killing all 12 people aboard, U.S. officials said.
Carl Vogt, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said the Lear jet had missed one approach to the airport and was attempting a second when it went down in a heavily wooded area on Dulles property.
"There's no sense that anyone lived. There's no one alive," Vogt said at an early afternoon news briefing at the airport. "The bodies are being taken out of the wreckage at this time."
A makeshift morgue was set up nearby and the bodies were to be transported to a Virginia medical examiner's facility in northern Virginia, police spokesman said.
Jose Henonin, a spokesman for the private, commercial chartering company TAESA in Mexico City, said the plane was an Executive Learjet with two crewmen and 10 passengers. He said the passengers were headed to Washington, D.C., for World Cup soccer. The first-round match between Norway and Mexico was slated for Sunday at Robert F. Kennedy Stadium.
U.S. authorities could not provide the identies of the victims, although Vogt did say they had Spanish surnames. Initially, he said he believed the plane belonged to the Mexican government but this turned out to be incorrect.
At the Mexican Embassy offices in downtown Washington, an official, Joaquim Martinez, said all crash victims were soccer "fans and their families. No members of the government."
Police and rescue workers with dogs combed the wreckage area, about four miles south of the airport's main terminal. Bulldozers had to be brought in to clear a path for rescue teams.
NTSB officials said there was no sign of fire at the time of the crash.
Dulles Airport is located 26 miles west of Washington.
Vogt said that NTSB investigators were at the scene and would probably remain there for at least three days.
"We will be conducting an onsite investigation," he said. Vogt told reporters that information available to U.S. officials was very sketchy, adding, "I am not going to speculate about what happened."

Daily Herald Chicago Illinois 1994-06-19