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Vermont - Quebec Earthquake, Nov 1893

SHAKEN BY AN EARTHQUAKE

MILD SENSATION IN THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY REGION.

Considerable Alarm Felt in Montreal, Particularly in the Narrow Streets ---Buildings Tremble and the Inmates Flee in Fright---Residents of Malone Greatly Excited---Reached Over Into New-Hampshire and Massachusetts.

BURLINGTON, Vt., Nov. 27.--- A severe earthquake shock shook the buildings throughout the city at 11:53 o'clock this forenoon. The duration of the shock was about fifteen seconds. It was accompanied by a low rumbling noise. Telegrams and telephone messages from surrounding towns report the shock as having occurred simultaneously throughout Western Vermont. Eastern New-York, and most of the Providence of Quebec and a part of Ontario.

BARRE, Vt., Nov. 27.---Residents of this city were startled this noon by a rumbling sound, which at first appeared to be the sound of a moving train, but proved to be an earthquake. Buildings shook, dishes rattled, and doors flew open. Reports indicate that the shock was felt in many parts of the Green Mountain State.

ST. JOHNSBURY, Vt., Nov. 27.---An earthquake shock of considerable proportion was experienced here about noon to-day. The tremor lasted three or four seconds. Buildings shook perceptibly, as if under the influence of some near-by explosion. It was the heaviest shock felt here for many years.

ST. ALBANS, Vt., Nov. 27.---An earthquake shock was felt in St. Albans a few minutes before noon. The movement of the earth was from south to north. The shock was of three to five second's duration. Buildings were shaken perceptibly, and the inmates rushed into the street in a number of instances.

MIDDLEBURY, Vt., Nov. 27.---Quite a strong earthquake shock was felt here at 11:50 o'clock this forenoon, making dishes rattle and throwing down stovepipes.

MONTREAL, Nov. 27.---A heavy shock of earthquake occurred here at 11:52 o'clock this morning, lasting about fifteen seconds. It was felt in all parts of the city and suburbs, and caused great commotion. Many of the tall buildings on St. James Street and in the central part of the city shook violently, and their occupants fled to the street.

In narrow streets like St. Francois Xavier, persons rushed out, looking up fearfully, as though expecting the stone walls to fall on them. It was the worst walls to fall on them. It was the worst shaking up Montreal has had for many a day. Dispatches received here show that the shock was distinctly felt to greater or less extent at many places in Quebec and Eastern Ontario.

The New York Times, New York, NY 28 Nov 1893



article | by Dr. Radut