Mt. Bountiful, UT Airliner Crashes, Nov 1940

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BODIES TAKEN FROM AIRLINER.

INVESTIGATION OF TRAGEDY PUSHED BY STATE, U.S. OFFICIALS.

Salt Lake City, Nov. 5 (AP) -- A pack train, carrying the bodies of ten persons killed in an airliner accident, came out of the silent and majestic Wasatch Mountains today.
Taken from the transport wreckage while state, federal and United Air Lines officials watched, the bodies were wrapped in canvas and tied to pack saddles for the torturous descent to Centerville, a hamlet at the foot of the range that has claimed three flying transports in six years.
The bodies were brought to Salt Lake City while officials assembled to investigate the tragedy.
In the dark of yesterday's early morning, 10 men and women, seven passengers and a crew of three, died as a big, bi-motored plane struck against the mountainside and was destroyed.
Postal officials recovered 213 pounds of airmail from the wreckage.
First bodies carried down the mountainside were those of the captain and first officer.
Others were prepared for removal after workers cut open the battered fuselage.
Officers and airline employes guarded the scene through the long chilly night.
Eastbound from San Francisco, the transport circled through a furious snowstorm in an attempt to "line up" the Salt Lake City airport and land. Instead, it smashed into the 25-degree slope of the Wasatch mountains which rise, at that point, to 7000 feet.
Force of the collision piled seven passengers and the stewardess in a fantastic, twisted heap at the front of the cabin, and broke the plane almost in half.
The pilots, Captain HOWARD FEY of Oakland, Calif., and First Officer THOMAS E. SANDEGREN of Tacoma, Wash., were catapulted from the cabin and tossed into the snow, 20 feet ahead of the severed nose of the plane.
The dead, besides the pilot and co-pilot, were listed on the passenger list as:
MR. and MRS. HOWARD C. MUIR of Detroit. MUIR was plant engineer for the Briggs Manufacturing company at Detroit, and the couple was en route from the bedside of a son recuperating from an operation.
MR. and MRS. L. WILSON of Maywood, Illinois, returning home from a visit to the coast. WILSON worked at Chicago for United Air Lines.
G. L. STEVENSON of Sacramento, Calif., finance company manager coming here to visit a sick father, W. L. Stevenson. The elder STEVENSON, died shortly after the accident without knowing his son was killed.
E. A. DYBDALE of Fergus Falls, Minn., inspector for the Minnesota state railroad and warehouse commission, en route home after visiting three sons in California.
JOSEPH CASSERO of Oakland, Calif., traveling to Detroit to buy new automobiles for the agency he operated.

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