Salt Lake City, UT (25 miles SW) Plane Crash, Dec 1936

ABANDON HOPE FOR OCCUPANTS AND MISSING PLANE.

SEARCHERS CONFIDENT PLANE WILL BE FOUND; TRACKS FOUND IN MOUNTAIN.

SEVEN ABOARD.

PASSENGERS AND CREW BELIEVED TO HAVE CRASHED TO DEATH IN HEAVY FOG.

Salt Lake City, Dec. 17. (AP) -- A freshly sheared mountain tree and possible "tracks of an airplane" drew searchers into a snow-drifted wilderness today, confident the fate of an airliner carrying two women and five men would be known by nightfall.
The passengers -- including a pretty stewardess who stepped deftly in and out of a triangular romance -- were feared to have crashed to death or to have died of exposure.
The hunt centered on the western slope of the Wasatch Mountains, 25 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, where several persons reported hearing a sputtering airplane motor early Tuesday, the day the Los Angeles-Salt Lake City Western Air express transport disappeared.

Believe Located.
At dusk yesterday a broken tree was found atop a ridge and on the nearby rim of a canyon were deep indentations in the shale. J. I. Hess, forest service foreman, said they "might be tracks of an airplane."
A sudden snowstorm cut short investigation last night.
Grimly, A. E. Cahlan of Las Vegas, spokesman for Western Air Express, admitted that officials believed "the plane's occupants have perished."
The missing were:
MR. and MRS. JOHN F. WOLFE, of Chicago, married only 17 days ago.
HENRY W. EDWARDS, Minneapolis, a representative of Northwest Airlines.
CARL CHRISTOPHER, Dwight, Ill., on his way home when informed his wife was seriously ill.
Stewardess GLADYS WITT, who recently made the headlines with a cross-country romantic mixup.
S. J. SAMSON, Pilot.
WILLIAM BOGEN, Pilot.

Kingsport Times Tennessee 1936-12-17