Terrell, TX Awning Collapse, Nov 1894

FULLY FIFTY PERSONS INJURED.

FELL WITH AN AWNING WHILE WATCHING A CIRCUS PARADE IN TEXAS.

Terrell, Texas, Nov. 3. -- A terrible accident happened here to-day, in which fully fifty persons were badly injured. The doctors believe the following will die:
MRS. A. J. ANTHONY.
MISS PEARL RUSHING.
MRS. A. L. ROBERTS.
MRS. SUTTON.
MRS. WADSWORTH.
A circus was in town, and the accident occurred while people were viewing the parade.
Over 100 persons were standing on a wooden awning. Their weight crushed it, and all fell in a heap on the sidewalk. The awning struck them with terrific force, badly injuring fully fifty persons.

The New York Times New York 1894-11-04

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FELL WITH A ROOF.

HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE WATCHING A CIRCUS PARADE.

OVER FIVE SCORE PERSONS HURT.

OUT OF A LIST OF SIXTY-FOUR INJURED THE WOMEN AND CHILDREN NUMBER FIFTY-FIVE -- A STRUCTURE BUILT FOR AN AWNING COLLAPSE WITH HUNDREDS ON TOP AND BENEATH -- WALL TUMBLES ON FIREMEN AT A LOUISVILLE BLAZE WITH FATAL RESULTS.

Terrell, Tex., Nov. 5. -- As the result of the collapse of an awning under which was a crowd of people assembled to witness a circus parade several persons were fatally crushed and 100 others more or less seriously injured. The remarkable thing about the list of injured is the large proportion of women and children, but mostly women. It was a mercy that there was not a long list of "instantly killed" to report from the nature of the accident and this was only averted by the other accident that one set of supports of the awning did not come loose from their positions.
With the dawn of the morning one of the most enjoyable days for the citizens of this community had been promised. People from miles around had gathered to attend Sells Brothers' circus and witness the parade. About half past 10 o'clock the parade entered Moore Avenue, the principal business street of the town.
That throughfare was crowded with people and the awnings and windows of the second stories of the business houses were filled with spectators. On the awnings of the Mississippi store in front of the dry goods house of Morris Brin an unusually large number of people had congregated to get a good view of the parade, 500 or more being on the awning and the sidewalk beneath was jammed.

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