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Austin, TX Wind Storm Mar 1897

GREAT BLOW AT AUSTIN.
Part of the University Buildings Unroofed and Other Damage.
Austin, Tex., March 28.-- The northern portion of the city was struck by a small sized cyclone this afternoon at 3 o'clock, which resulted in considerable damage to property, but fortunately no lives were lost.
The wind got in its most damaging work on the state university. The roof of Brackinridge hall was lifted off and carried across the street, falling on a dwelling house occupied by Mrs. Shepherd. The cottage was smashed, but the inmates escaped.
The hall is occupied by about forty students and their belongings were ruined by water. In some portions of the building water stands at a depth of three feet.
The university is damaged to the extent of every chimney being down and the windows on the west side of the assembly hall are smashed in. About 500 beautiful young shade trees in the campus are lying on the ground, some of them being twisted from the roots.
The "Honey" church, at the corner of Twenty-fourth and Whites avenue, is a total wreck. The northern portion of the roof was carried away and the end walls crumbled in. Adjoining it, the residence of City Physician Graves was partially destroyed, causing the family to vacate immediately. The tin roof of the residence was carried away by the wind and deposited in the yard of Prof. Winston, a block away.
A new residence in course of construction, belonging to Burt McDonald, corner of Seventeenth and Congress avenue, was almost totally demolished.
It fell against the residence of William Vining.
One of the city electric towers, located on the extreme west end of Sixth street, was blown down, the base being bent like a small twig.
The residence of G. W. Littlefield was slightly damaged, portions of the cornice work being destroyed.
The university mess hall has been deserted and the students can be seen moving the goods to various boarding-houses and hunting places to spend the night.
Several small shanties in portions of the colored quarters are on the ground and chimneys all over the city are blown down.
A heavy rain fell during the storm. Oldtimers say that Austin has not been visited by such a gale for years.
Dallas Morning News, Dallas, TX 29 Mar 1897



article | by Dr. Radut