McKinney, TX Passenger Train Wreck, Jun 1878

WRECKED.

THE NORTH BOUND PASSENGER TRAIN ON THE HOUSTON AND TEXAS CENTRAL RAILROAD WRECKED NEAR McKINNEY YESTERDAY MORNING.

ELDER KNOWLES SHAW, A WELL KNOWN EVANGELIST, KILLED OUTRIGHT, AND TWENTY-SEVEN PERSONS MORE OR LESS SERIOUSLY WOUNDED.

THE PASSENGER COACH AND SLEEPER THROWN DOWN AN EMBANKMENT FORTY FEET HIGH - A BROKEN RAIL THE CAUSE - LIST OF THE WOUNDED - FULL PARTICULARS OF THE ACCIDENT.

A disastrous accident to the north bound passenger train, on the Houston and Texas Central railroad, occurred about two miles south of McKinney, at a quarter past nine o'clock yesterday morning, which was attended with death and destruction.
The train consisted of engine, baggage and mail car, two passenger coaches and a sleeper, and was running at usual speed. Arriving at the point designated, which was on an embankment about forty feet high, and near Wilson's Creek a broken rail precipitated the rear coach and the sleeper down the embankment and completely wrecked that part of the train. All the other parts ran over the brake in the road, and were not materially damaged.

The first news received of the accident was a telegram to Captain C. M. Wheat from Elder Kirk Baxter, pastor of the Christian Church here, breaking the startling intelligence that ELDER KNOWLES SHAW, who was in company with him aboard the train was killed out right, and requesting him to come up at once.
A number of telegrams were sent and received during the morning, yet the answers received were rather vague and contradictory. Throughout the day there was great anxiety felt in this city as majority of the passengers had friends here who were desirous of knowing the fate of the passengers after the first news of the accident had been confirmed.

The very latest and fullest account both by telegraph and from reporters detailed to go to the scene of the accident, is to the effect that there were in all twenty-seven persons more or less wounded, and one killed. Of the wounded the following names are those who were at McKinney, at the American House, late yesterday evening, the others having gone north on the train, which went on to its destination in an hour or so after the accident. Those whose names do not appear in the list of wounded, received slight bruises only.

Wounded.
REV. GEORGE W. HENRY, of Denison, severely about the head.
MRS. AGGIE, wife of G. W. HENRY, severely about the head.
MISS KATIE HENRY, slightly.
G. W. HENRY, JR., slightly.
MISS CARRY SPOONER, of Denison, about the head, slightly.
MISS AUGUSTA STIDMAN, deaf mute, from asylum at Austin, slightly.
REV. J. T. MILLER, of Ennis, severely.
ALBERT BILLINGS, sleeping car porter, slightly.
ELDER KIRK BAXTER, of Dallas, about the head and chest, dangerously.
GEORGE MOUNTCASTLE, postmaster at Allen, dangerously.
S. C. ANDERSON, employee of R. V. Tompkins, Dallas, slightly.
Conductor LASHER, rib broken and some slight bruises.
REV. W. L. MALLORY, Sherman, slightly.
Someone, name unknown, from Mineola, slightly.

Killed.
No one was killed but ELDER KNOWLES SHAW, of Mississippi. MR. SHAW arrived here on the fourth day of May last, under an engagement of the Commerce Street Christian church to conduct a revival, which was continued thirty-three days and nights, during which time he delivered sixty-six discourses. The result of his efforts was one hundred and eleven additional members to the church.
From a prominent member of the Christian church of this city, it is learned that MR. SHAW was born in the state of Ohio in 1834, and at an early age moved to Indiana. Shortly after, his father died and left him at the head of the family. At the age of seventeen years he joined the Christian church, shortly after which he began preaching, and if he had lived until the first day of next January he would have been preaching twenty-one years. The past fifteen years of his life has been spent as an evangelist, and in supporting and helping various churches. At the age of twenty-three years, he married a Miss Finley, of Virginia, and continued to reside in Indiana up to a short time ago, when he moved to Columbus, Mississippi. He leaves a wife and two children, a young lady about nineteen years old, and a youth about sixteen years old. He was very successful as a revivalist and had attained some notoriety in the northern and western states for his success in this line and for his compilation of Sunday school songs. He is the author of five Sunday school song books, his last work being the "Morning Star," of which three editions of five thousand each has been published within the last three months.
MR. SHAW, at the time of the accident, was sitting in the passenger coach talking with Rev. Mr. Mallory, to whom he was introduced a short time before by Elder Baxter. Mr. Mallory says MR. SHAW saved his (Mallory's) life by grabbing him and pushing him away from the position in which he fell himself. MR. SHAW'S right was broken in two or three places, there is a severe cut on top of his head, one on the forehead, slightly on the nose, and his lower limbs were badly mangled and his neck broken.