Brownwood, TX Passenger Train Wreck, Nov 1889

WRECK ON THE SANTA FE.

NEAR BROWNWOOD -- MANY SERIOUSLY INJURED -- A NARROW ESCAPE.

Goldthwaite, Tex., Nov. 3. -- The south bound Santa Fe passenger train, consisting of five coaches and two baggage cars, was wrecked this morning at 6 o'clock about three miles south of Brownwood, in which the two rear chair cars were thrown from the track and rolled down a fifteen-foot embankment and thirty or forty passengers more or less injured, some fatally. The wreck was caused by a broken rail. When the two rear coaches struck it they left the track, turning over and breaking loose from the train and rolling down the embankment. Conductor Hough at once stopped the train and when the other passengers went back a terrible sight was witnessed. The two coaches were lying bottom upwards and men, women and children were screaming for help. The windows had to be broken open to rescue the passengers, who were piled together and the chairs lying on top of them. One of the coaches caught fire three times but was promptly extinguished. After the passengers were all rescued the train was backed up to Brownwood, where two of the wounded were left. The train then came on to Zephyr, where MR. T. B. JONES, of Bellville, Ill., who was supposed to be dying, was left. The train then proceeded to this place, where the company's physicians, Drs. H. P. Smith and Gober, attended the suffering. The car which contained the wounded presented a sad spectacle, men and ladies were groaning and calling for aid.
The list of wounded as far as could be ascertained is as follows:
SIGNOR CAUSIN.
L. G. CARR.
BILLIE BOOKER.
D. BOONE.
A. C. ROUSS.
MISS LILLIE McLEBURN.
MISS GOLDIE BEIGH.
FRANCIS HOWARD.
A. E. NEEZ.
F. F. DILLON.
ED COX.
DR. J. B. TAYLOR.
FRANK HARRIS.
J. MORTON.
W. A. SPAUGH.
MISS LULA BELL.
MRS. McGEE.
The above named are mostly from Dallas, San Antonio and Caldwell, Tex.
L. B. JONES, Belleville, Ill., and Sheriff JOHNSON and wife of San Angelo were considerably bruised up, also MRS. PRESCOTT and two children from this place. Quite a number of the wounded failed to give their names or place of residence. The physicians think that two of the ladies will die. Dr. Smith accompanied the train from here to look after the wounded. It is a great wonder that many were not killed outright, as the coaches turned over two or three times, and were full of passengers returning from the San Angelo fair.
The infant daughter of W. P. THOMPSON, editor of the Mountaineer of this place, died yesterday and was buried today.

Galveston Daily News Texas 1889-11-04