Skip to Content

Columbia, TN Tornado, Nov 1900

THE CASUALTIES IN COLUMBIA.

In That Town Alone Twenty-five Were Killed and Fifty Injured. The Path of the Storm Was Only Fifty Yards Wide.

Nashville, Nov. 22. - The storm which swept Tennessee Tuesday night was the most destructive ever known in the state. More than 50 persons were killed and a hundred more injured, while the damage to houses, timber and other property will reach large figures.

The storm entered the state from northern Mississippi and swept across in a northeasterly direction. Great damage is reported from the counties bordering on Mississippi and further on Columbia, in Maury county, is the (illegible) (illegible) (illegible), (illegible)ville and Gallatin also felt the wind's force, the storm finally losing its force against the Cumberland mountain range.

Columbia's casualties number 25 dead and 50 injured, the list of the dead, so far as known, being as follows:
MISSES FLORENCE and EVELYN FARRELL, CAPT. And MRS. A. F. AYDELOTT, GUY AYDELOTT, PAUL AYDELOTT, JAMES CHERRY, MISS LIZZIE FORSYTHE, MRS. TOM CARROLL and MISS M. J. VILES (all white); GEORGE WINFIELD, WIFE and CHILD, TOM HACKNEY, JOE SCOTT, GLASS BROWN, PETER ADAMS, JOHN FRYERSON, cook at the Carrolls, and five unknown negroes.

The path of the storm is about 50 yards wide and was through the north-western suburbs of the town. In its path everything is completely wrecked. Not even the iron and stone fence of the arsenal grounds are standing.

The houses of Capt. Ayedlott, the Carrolls, and two other large residences were demolished. With the exception of these four houses the storm's path was through a section of the town populated chiefly by negroes and the poorer classes, and the houses were mere hovels. It is estimated that 150 of them were totally destroyed and a larger number damaged. The suffering of the people rendered homeless and bereft of all their goods is pitiable.

The News, Frederick, MD 22 Nov 1900

--------

Birmingham. Ala., Nov. 21. - A special to the Age-Herald by long distance telephone from Columbia, Tenn., says:
A terrific cyclone, moving in a westerly direction, struck this place at 9:30 o'clock Monday night and left havoc in its path.

The northern and western sections of the city, populated principally by negroes, were almost entirely swept away. Fifteen persons are known to have been killed, and it is feared that this number will be largely increased by later reports. The dead are MISSES FLORENCE and EVELYN FARRELL, CAPTAIN A. F. ADOLETTE, WIFE and one SON; another son and daughter are missing; MISS KATE FORSYTHE, JAMES CHERRY and six negroes, names unknown.

Continued on page 2



article | by Dr. Radut