Charleston, SC Hurricane Strikes, Aug 1911

Charleston SC 1911 hurricane at battery.gif

FEARFUL STORM VISITS THE SOUTH.

MANY ARE KILLED AND PROPERTY DAMAGE IS MORE THAN A MILLION DOLLARS.

WRECKS IN HARBOR.

CHARLESTON AND SAVANNAH SUFFER FROM HIGH WIND -- SOUTH CAROLINA CUT OFF FROM TELEGRAPH SERVICE FOR MANY HOURS -- TIDE RISES EIGHT FEET IN CHARLESTON -- FEDERAL BUILDINGS ARE DAMAGED -- WIND BLOWS NEARLY ONE HUNDRED MILES AN HOUR -- INSTRUMENTS REFUSE TO WORK.

Charleston, S.C., Aug. 28. -- (via Summerville, S.C.) -- Seven persons are known to be dead, many injured and property damage of more than $1,000,000 wrought by the storm which struck Charleston Sunday afternoon, isolating that city from the rest of the world.
The dead:
W. H. SMITH, Columbia, drowned under falling wharf.
Motorman CUTTER, drowned.
IDA ROBINSON, crushed by roof.
ROSA ROBINSON, crushed by roof.
ALONZO J. COBURN, engineer, killed by flying timber.
EVA MYERS, drowned.
TOM DOOLY, drowned.
The CASSIDY family, number unknown, caretakers at the Wahoo Fertilizer Mills, are missing, and are believed to have been drowned.
The harbor is filled with wreckage and the streets are strewn with debris. Among the holdings damaged are the custom house, the postoffice and the Wahoo Fertilizer mills.
The street car, electric, telephone and fire alarm systems are out of commission. All trains are leaving the city from an old depot, as the floor of the new station is under water.
At the height of the storm the wind reached 94 miles an hour, while the tide rose eight feet at the battery in front of the city.

Summerville, S.C., Aug. 28. -- As the result of a freak storm which struck this city and Savannah last night and which reached hurricane proportions. Charleston has been practically isolated from the world for 24 hours. Five persons are known to have been killed near here and property losses it is estimated will reach $1,000,000.
The storm became serious about 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon. At noon the barometer registered 29.75, after having fallen steadily all day. The wind velocity increased from 48 miles an hour at 1:25 p.m. to 94 miles at 2:30 p.m., when the wind gauge was put out of adjustment. Later the wind veered from the northeast and east to the southeast.
At noon today the barometer stood at 29.79, the wind was only brisk and the sun was trying to shine. The rainfall was more than two inches. The disturbance was reported to be west of Charleston and working away.
The tide was something over eight feet, three feet short of the record of 1893. Considerable damage was done by water in the low sections of the city and many persons were rescued from their houses.
A. C. BURNS, an engineer on the Charleston division of the Southern railway, was killed while sitting in the yardmaster's office when flying timber crashed through the window and broke his neck.
A MR. SMITH of Columbia and Motorman COTTER of the local street railway system were killed and T. D. KINTWORTHY of St. Stephens and E. B. HILL were seriously injured when a trestle adjoining the Mount Pleasant ferry collapsed. Two unidentified men were drowned when their home was flooded. Several negroes are reported among the drowned victims.
Great damage is feared for the rice and Sea island cotton industries by the rise of the tide.

Anaconda Standard Montana 1911-08-29