Block Island, RI Submarine and Steamer CITY OF ROME Collide, Sept 1925

U.S. SUBMARINE S-51 SUNK, 37 LIVES LOST; HIT BY STEAMSHIP OFF BLOCK ISLAND WHILE SUBMERGED ON PRACTICE CRUISE

PROVIDENCE, R. I., Sept. 25 (AP) — The steamship "City of Rome" was in collision and sunk the submerged submarine S-51, twenty miles east of Block Island, at about 7:30 o'clock tonight. Thirty-seven men aboard the submarine are reported drowned. Three men were picked up by the "City of Rome," which sent a message to the submarine base at New London, reporting the accident.

Lieutenant H. Dobson was the commander of the submarine. Lieutenant Dobson is from New York State, according to the naval records. The S-51 is of the first line of that class of ships in the Navy. She was attached to the patrol force operating in the Atlantic under the flagship "U.S.S Camden," and was a member of Division 2, stationed at New London.

The "City of Rome" was on her way from Savannah to Boston and was due in the latter city today. The S-51 was in Providence on Oct. 26, 1922, and took a party including former Governor Emery J. San Souei and Mayor Joseph H. Gainer on a trip from the State Pier down Providence harbor. Hundreds of residents of this city and vicinity took advantage of the opportunity offered by the Navy officers to view the vessel while here in connection with the observance of "Navy Day."

Boston Yard Awaits Word

BOSTON, Mass. (Saturday), Sept. 26 — Up to 3:20 this morning, the Boston Navy Yard had no details of the sinking of the S-51. It was said that a radio message by one station to the "City of Rome" brought the reply that there was no information to give out at present.

New London Has Different Time

The Naval Submarine Base at New London reported by telephone to THE NEW YORK TIMES early this morning that the only information it had received on the disaster was the fact of its occurrence, about 10:24 P. M., and the news that three men had been saved.

It was not known there now many men were aboard the ill-fated craft, and officials at the base were looking up the muster roll to find out. The submarine, it was said, was on its regularly scheduled manoeuvres, involving engine tests principally.

Informed that the submarine was reported to have been running submerged when struck, it was said at the base that no information on this point had arrived, but that it was doubtful.

Continued