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Montreal, QB Tank Plunges Through Herald Building, June 1910

THIRTY DIE IN BIG FIRE.

PLANT OF MONTREAL HERALD IS DESTROYED TODAY.

FIFTY ARE INJURED -- MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN SUFFER IN THE BIG CATASTROPHE.

A BIG TANK FELL -- IT CRASHED THROUGH FOUR FLOORS, STARTING THE BIG BLAZE.

Montreal, June 13. -- One of the worst catastrophes in the history of Montreal occurred today at the building of the Montreal Herald, in St. James street, when some thirty men, women and children lost their lives. Fifty more were injured more or less seriously and the plant and premises were destroyed. A huge tank on the roof collapsed and fell through four floors, carrying death and destruction in its path. Several of the employes went with if from the roof to the floor, where it upset the machinery and, breaking the electric wires, started a blaze which in a few minutes shot up to the roof. None of the victims had any chance to escape. Without the slightest warning the big tank broke down its supports, crushed the roof in like an egg shell and plunged through the bindery, job department, artists' room, down in the main floor. On the top floor, which was devoted to the bindery business there were sixty-eight employes. On the third, where the job printing department is situated, there were 138 persons employed. On the main floor were twenty men and two women.

Montreal, June 13. -- The Montreal Herald building was destroyed by fire today and a number of employes were reported caught in the debris and burned to death. Fifteen persons were reported missing, but how many of these were victims could not be learned until the ruins cooled sufficiently to permit a search.
A big water tank on the roof caused a wall to collapse and a gas explosion followed setting fire to the structure. The loss will exceed $200,000.
At 3 o'clock it was impossible to get an official list of the killed. The number of dead was put at fourteen, and injured at thirty-five. It was admitted by officials of the company that over thirty might be dead.
The big water tank which caused the catastrophe was constructed over the middle of the building and apparently fell three stories through the bindery and job department to the editorial offices on the first floor. Most of the casualties were among the bindery girls and printers. The fire
broke out immediately afterwards and the firemen were unable to get into that part of the building where the bodies were.
WILLIAM TAYLOR, foreman of the composing room, said he believed that fifty were killed. He suffered painful injuries. He says the collapsing water tank practically cut the building in two.

The Fort Wayne News Indiana 1910-06-13



article | by Dr. Radut